Amsterdam

For Israeli Arabs and Jews, Soccer Puts Identity Politics In Play

Cultural tensions and overlaps on view in World Cup rooting interests.

06/29/2010
Israel Correspondent

Tel Aviv — At World Cup time, soccer fever is hailed as a cosmopolitan common denominator.

A café in the central square in Nazareth, is adorned with flags of World Cup favorites. Right, fans watch a match at Tel Aviv.

CITYarts Draws Kids To Peace

04/27/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

Tsipi Ben-Haim is a woman possessed with a mission to bring art to inner city youth. As the executive and artistic director of CITYarts, she has created 260 projects in 37 years in urban areas around the globe that bring people together to create murals and mosaics and unique “peace walls.”

At an awards dinner at the Ana Tzarev Gallery in Midtown, the Israeli-born dynamo told 300 supporters that her group has painted a peace wall in the Jacob Schiff Park at 138th St. and Amsterdam Ave. There is also a new one in Karachi, Pakistan.

CITYarts director Tsipi Ben-Haim pays tribute to Amir Dossal at a benefit to empower children through art. Photo:Tim Boxer

Sports Nicknames And The Jews

04/29/2005
Special to the Jewish Week

When an ethnic group or race endearingly becomes the nickname for a sports team, does that signal their arrival or shame? Native Americans have long decried the way sports fans have adopted tomahawk chops and tribal chants as ways to either root for or ridicule the Indians, Braves, and Redskins. On the other hand, the Irish don't seem at all bothered by Notre Dame's celebration of the poetry to their more pugnacious side.

Lessons Of History

09/19/2003
Special to The Jewish Week

Frankfurt, Germany - Amsterdam has long been a place of education and remembrance of Anne Frank. But in her hometown of Frankfurt, Germany, Frank's life and death for years have been marked only with a plaque on one of her two former homes and an elementary school renamed in her honor. Annual ceremonies were held on her birthday from 1957 to 1970, but until now there has never been an ambitious permanent site dedicated to telling the story of one of the most famous and eloquent victims of the Holocaust.

A Mismatched Trio, Strange But True

11/07/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

Jack Polak states the situation quite succinctly at the outset of Michele Ohayon’s new documentary, “Steal a Pencil for Me.” The engaging nonagenarian, who is one of the film’s central figures, smiles slyly at the camera and says, “I’m a very special Holocaust survivor. I was in the camps with my wife and my girlfriend and, believe me, it wasn’t easy.”

Frank Talk

10/09/1998
Jewish Week Book Critic

Next June, Anne Frank would be 70 years old. Public interest in the young Anne Frank and her diary — an account of her 25 months hiding from the Nazis in a secret annex in Amsterdam, which has now been translated into 55 languages, with more than 25 million copies sold — is unceasing, with new editions of the diary, a recent revival of the Broadway play, documentary films, children’s books, dissertations and critical articles, with frequent contention between the people and organizations who claim to represent her interests.

Last-Minute Light

12/05/2007
Special To The Jewish Week

Even gift givers who are always late get a reprieve with Chanukah’s eight nights. Here are some last-minute opportunities to do good, dazzle friends and family, and extend the light.

Miep Gies And Saintliness

01/15/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

The question Roman Catholics throughout the world should be asking themselves this week is why there hasn’t been more talk about someday making Miep Gies a saint.

Miep Gies: Knighted by the Netherlands, honored by Yad Vashem, she offers the Catholic Church a true example of sainthood.

MUSIC

02/13/2009
Special To The Jewish Week
Resurrection: Two classical ensembles and a new Web site pay tribute to the music of the Shoah. Holocaust scholars and intellectuals in allied fields have argued for most of the past six and a half decades whether there was such a thing as a cultural resistance to the Shoah. Did creating works of art in the confines of Terezin constitute a rebuke to the Nazis or an unwitting submission? In the face of such brutal inhumanity, how powerful a subversive act could a piece of music, a painting or a performance be?
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