Technology

A Mountain To Climb

03/01/2002
Staff Writer
She packed her skis, as usual. She packed her poles, as usual. She packed her bindings, as usual. Dr. Ruth Spector, an avid skier, was hitting the slopes last week. She also packed her helmet, not as usual. You don’t risk injury when you have leukemia. “I never wear a helmet,” says Spector, a 41-year-old anesthesiologist who lives in Lake Success, L.I.

From Austria With Questions

03/01/2002
Staff Writer
A photocopy of a small, handwritten note in German, composed about 60 years ago, was another translation job for Philipp Bulgarini the other day. The final words of a death camp-bound Jew in Nazi Germany, scribbled in a crowded cattle car, the message was apparently thrown off a train with the hope that it would reach his or her relatives still in safety. Bulgarini says the words spoke to him.

A Voice For The Macs

02/15/2002
Staff Writer
Adam Cohen had two dreams as a kid in Great Neck: to play shortstop for the Mets and to become a sportscaster. The Mets haven’t called yet. “I don’t think that is going to happen,” he says. But his second dream has come true. Cohen, 22, has teamed with Avi Bloom, 21, to broadcast the Yeshiva University men’s basketball team home games this season over the Internet. Their broadcasts on the school’s Web site (www.yu.edu) replace the ones that were carried for several years on the now-defunct student radio station.

Still Out In The Cold

02/08/2002
Staff Writer
Yossi Goldberg played soccer and basketball as a boy growing up in Israel, but figure skating was in his blood — his mother was a figure skater in Lithuania. That, says Goldberg, founder and president of the Israeli Figure Skating Association, is why he has devoted a dozen years to a winter sport in a Mediterranean country.

Back On Key

02/24/2000
Staff Writer
Ruth Magied sits down at the piano in her Midwood apartment and dives into Beethoven’s “Moonlight Sonata.” Her fingers lightly, fluently, dance over the keys. The music stops after a few minutes and Magied stands up. She turns from the piano, the instrument that filled her childhood, to the topic that occupied her adolescence — pain. “Pain,” she says, “can destroy your brain. It’s like having four root canals that never go away. It’s like having someone hitting you over your head with a frying pan.”

Borough Park Abduction Alert

07/20/2007
Staff Writer
The largely Orthodox community of Borough Park was on high alert this week, and patrols by the 66th Precinct and the Shomrim civilian group in the Brooklyn neighborhood were increased, after a 4-year-old girl was abducted from a Borough Park street and sexually molested on Monday evening. The Boro Park Shomrim, whose 150 volunteers patrol the area in cars and by foot around the clock, stepped up their activities this week, and sent out security alerts to residents, said Rabbi Jacob Daskal, coordinator.

HUC Closes New York Kollel

06/29/2007
Staff Writer
The New York Kollel, a 12-year-old adult education program that has met at the Reform movement’s rabbinical seminary in Manhattan and offered advanced yeshiva-style studies from a non-denominational, non-Orthodox perspective, is giving its last classes this summer. Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, which has housed and helped support the Kollel since 1995, announced this spring that it would close the program, following a two and a half year “strategic planning process” that found the Kollel to be a financial drain.

Gentrification Eats Up Kosher Bakery

06/22/2007
Staff Writer
A cup of coffee and a Danish. For the last 20 years, lunchtime for Rabbi T. has meant a two-and-a-half block walk from one Lower East Side institution, Mesivta Tifereth Jerusalem, the yeshiva where he teaches Talmud, to Gertel’s, a kosher bakery where he buys a snack and sits at a small table, reviewing a Hebrew text. (Many members of the haredi community are publicity-shy.) Starting Monday, Rabbi T. will have to get his lunch somewhere else.

Frozen Out?

06/01/2007
Staff Writer
There was mixed news for Benjamin Rubin, a Sabbath-observant hockey player in Canada’s top development league, at the end of his first season the other day. In a post-season talk with owner-coach Patrick Roy of the Quebec Remparts in the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League, Rubin, 18, heard that he is one of the team’s “most talented players.”
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