Sports

The Paradox Of Yossi Abramowitz

06/30/2006
Staff Writer
Yosef Abramowitz had the floor at the closing session of the first national Jewish Youth Philanthropy Conference in Denver last April. Striding around the hotel conference room among about 100 teenagers, microphone in hand like a latter-day Phil Donohue, he exhorted them to see themselves as powerful agents of change, as prophets and leaders. He talked about great visions of a Jewish future, quoting philosophers from Zionist thinker Achad Ha’Am to “Star Wars” wise man Yoda. He held their attention for about 20 minutes.

The Rabbi-To-Be Gets A Title Shot

Lubavitch middleweight Yuri Foreman is primed to make boxing history.

11/04/2009
Staff Writer

The verbal sparring starts as soon as Yuri Foreman begins his training session.

Foreman, a native of Belarus who moved with his family to Israel at age 10 to escape anti-Semitism, and then to New York City at 19 alone to prepare for a boxing career, is a fighter with a rare pedigree  — a top-ranked light middleweight contender and a rabbinical student. As perhaps befits a guy who pores carefully over religious texts, he is a ring tactician so cautiously methodical that critics call him Yuri “Boreman.”

Foreman, right, training in Brooklyn, fights for world title next week. Michael Datikash

Matisyahu’s New Spiritual Groove

11/28/2007
Staff Writer
It is only a few miles from Crown Heights to Greenpoint, Brooklyn, but in some respects, the asphalt avenues linking them bridge entirely disparate worlds. Matisyahu Miller  — known to his legions of fans by his first name, and to his friends simply as Matis — makes the trip almost daily. He bikes from the Crown Heights apartment he shares with his wife and two young sons to the loft space he’s just rented in the old industrial neighborhood, giving him a place to write and rehearse his next album.

The Ultimate Jewish Fighter

07/28/2000
Staff Writer
It is the fifth round of a martial arts championship fight and the two strapping gladiators are fighting exhaustion as well as each other. Moti Horenstein is exchanging punches and kicks with Peter Vine. "It was a matter of who wanted it more," Horenstein says in his Spring Valley office, narrating his 1996 Shidokan match at Chicago's Bismarck Palace.

God's Welterweight

12/09/2005
Staff Writer
This champ sees God in the speed bag, halacha in the heavy bag, and when he does his roadwork on the streets of Midwood, he feels the presence of the divine. And like the more famous Champ that came before him, one Muhammad Ali, this smaller, very Jewish champ can turn a phrase and deliver some lip. "Anyone who wants a good whuppin' from me is just going to have to wait until sundown [on Saturday]," says Dmitriy Salita, the "Star of David," as he's called in the boxing business.

Carolina On His Mind

03/09/2007
Staff Writer
Chapel Hill, N.C. — With 11 minutes left in the first half of a recent University of North Carolina home basketball game against the Wake Forest Demon Deacons, the giant TV screens above the Dean E. Smith Center flash the image of a graying, bespectacled septuagenarian Jew from the East Bronx.

Gov’t Pokes Holes In Reimer’s Story

08/21/1998
Staff Writer
He buttoned his sweater, straightened his cuffs, took a gulp of bottled water, glanced around the courtroom and began to explain why, after 46 years in the United States, he should not lose his citizenship. “I didn’t do anything to anybody,” Jack Reimer said.

Gov’t Pokes Holes In Reimer’s Story

08/21/1998
Staff Writer
He buttoned his sweater, straightened his cuffs, took a gulp of bottled water, glanced around the courtroom and began to explain why, after 46 years in the United States, he should not lose his citizenship. “I didn’t do anything to anybody,” Jack Reimer said.
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