Religion

Tweeting the Flotilla Attack

Peter Beinart's essay "The Failure of the American Jewish Establishment" in The New York Review of Books argues that most of the mainstream American Jewish organizations have abandoned liberalism on the issues of the Middle East and are responsible for a generation of young Jews who hold no connection to Israel.

Palestinian members of Hamas naval police prepare for arrival of flotilla

Glenn Beck versus the Jewish Funds for Justice, round 3

The thing about right-wing talk show hosts is that their whole shtick is outrageousness; attacking them for their hyperbolic anger is sort of like attacking Natalie Portman for being beautiful and talented.

Still, that hasn't slowed down the Jewish Funds for Justice, which is continuing its intense criticism of Beck – who has responded as... well, as expected.

Beinart Marginalized? The Left's Big Lie and Self-Pity

I'm fine with any critique of the Jewish establishment from serious Jews and serious journalists, people who deeply love Israel and disagree with its policies. Not acceptable, though, are the assimilationists and anti-Israel -- yes, let's call them that -- leftists who piggy-back on the legitimate Jewish left as a beard to cover their loathing of all things Jewish and Israeli. They are the ones who say they can't attend even the harmless. non-political Salute to Israel Parade or show the flag or even allow Ambassador Oren to speak, because of the mean ol' Israeli government.

For Manning-Kaplan Duo, Jewish Nonprofits are the Ties That Bind

05/28/2010
JTA

PALM BEACH, Fla. (JTA) -- It’s a cool spring night, and Kathy Manning and Randall Kaplan are battling their way out of the west lawn of the sprawling bay-side mansion of Jane Goldman and Benjamin Lewis.

Manning, the chairwoman of the Jewish Federations of North America, and Kaplan, the chairman of the board of governors of Hillel: The Foundation for Jewish Campus Life, have just spent a few hours schmoozing with 80 donors, a handful of boards of trustees and several members of Hillel’s board trying to make the case for their organizations.

New Zealand Bans Shechita

05/28/2010
JTA

SYDNEY (JTA) – New Zealand has banned shechita, the kosher slaughter of animals.

The country’s new animal welfare code, which took effect Friday, mandates that all animals for commercial consumption be stunned prior to slaughter to ensure they are treated “humanely and in accordance with good practice and scientific knowledge.”

The regulation has shocked the Jewish community.

Panel Discussion: The Jewish community's obligation to children with special needs

 On May 24, 2010, a panel of experts gathered at Cong. Shearith Israel in Manhattan to discuss the Jewish community's obligation to children with special needs.

 

Beinart Pleasantly Surprised He Hasn’t Been Marginalized

Peter Beinart, the former New Republic editor whose strong critique of the American Jewish establishment in a New York Review of Books essay continues to reverberate in the community, says he has been pleasantly surprised by the responses he has received from pro-Israel critics

Beinart's Cheating Heart (Intermarriage Might Be The Answer)

Let's start off with a song by Hank Williams that pretty much sums up Israel's response to American Jews: "Why can't you be the way you used to be? How come you find so many faults with me? Somebody's changed so let me give you a clue, why don't you love me like you used to do?"

Pro-Israel, With Questions: Beinart Pins his Thesis to the Synagogue Door

05/26/2010
JTA

WASHINGTON (JTA) -- Peter Beinart attends an Orthodox synagogue, once edited The New Republic (the closest thing to a smicha for Jewish policy wonks) and backed Sen. Joe Lieberman’s quixotic 2004 bid to become the first Jewish president.

Which is why he’s always been counted among the Washington pundits who defend Israel, Zionism and the right of American Jews to lobby for a strong U.S.-Israel relationship.

Beinart also frets about how Jewish his kids will be.

Small Steps Toward Inclusion

For the second time in a month I found myself covering a program the other night on increasing inclusion for children with special needs in Jewish schools. Part of the reason this isn't a coincidence is that some of the same people were involved in the planning. But anecdotally, there also seems to be greater consciousness and emphasis on addressing the burdens of such families in the observant Jewish community, who face all the same pressures of affiliated life, and then some.

Syndicate content