Law

Are Scaled-Down Yeshivas A Bargain?

05/13/2009

Assistant Managing Editor
Forget the sports teams, the debating club, or the science lab. Get used to a more crowded classroom, with only one teacher. And if there are any computers, they won’t be state-of-the-art. Welcome to the low-cost, no-frills yeshiva, an idea whose time may have come in this era of financial struggle, and one that could be a reality as soon as next year. The Orthodox Union says 135 existing schools in North America are in discussions about creating new, discount full-time Jewish education for $6,500 per year, or less than half the current average of $15,000.

Are Scaled-Down Yeshivas A Bargain?

05/13/2009

Assistant Managing Editor
Forget the sports teams, the debating club, or the science lab. Get used to a more crowded classroom, with only one teacher. And if there are any computers, they won’t be state-of-the-art. Welcome to the low-cost, no-frills yeshiva, an idea whose time may have come in this era of financial struggle, and one that could be a reality as soon as next year. The Orthodox Union says 135 existing schools in North America are in discussions about creating new, discount full-time Jewish education for $6,500 per year, or less than half the current average of $15,000.

Jewish Groups Posting Latest Swine Flu Data

05/06/2009
Assistant Managing Editor
Jewish community organizations have been posting up-to-the-minute information about the swine flu epidemic this week, and as of Monday there were no known cases of the virus reported by any Jewish school or institution. As word of the outbreak spread last week the Secure Community Network sent out a memo and materials Monday provided by the Centers for Disease Control to hundreds of Jewish institutions, including federations and Jewish community centers. SCN has an existing partnership with the CDC and the Department of Homeland Security.

A Jewish Lifeline In the Economic Downturn

04/29/2009

Assistant Managing Editor
In a junior congregation room at the Young Israel of Woodmere, on Long Island, they are greeted warmly at the door and don blue nametags. Some linger by the refreshments; others schmooze in the center of the room. The bold make their own introductions, while the more reserved wait for the formal program to begin. It looks like a singles mixer, but the more than 100 people — men and women, young and middle-aged — are seeking matches of a different sort. They are job seekers, casualties of an economic downturn that has hit the Jewish communal world particularly hard.

More Kosher Soup Kitchens Planned

03/18/2009

Assistant Managing Editor
When people enter the Masbia soup kitchen in Borough Park, they approach a wooden podium of the sort used by a maitre d’. But no reservations are required at Masbia, currently the city’s only kosher soup kitchen, and clients are simply asked to sign their name before filling their dinner plates. While in the past they may have been asked to present a letter of reference from a rabbi or community leader to show that they are in need, these days that restriction has all but fallen by the wayside.

Stimulus Aid Boosts Agencies

02/18/2009
Assistant Managing Editor
The $24.6 billion in federal aid for New York, which will cover Medicaid reimbursement as well as spending on education and transportation, will offer a reprieve, if only temporary, of devastating cuts to hospitals and nursing homes. With the state spending less on Medicaid, money will be freed up to keep nonprofit workers on the payroll. “We have a two-year reprieve, and hopefully in that period of time the economy will perk up,” said Ron Soloway, UJA-Federation’s lobbyist in Albany.

UPDATE: Chabad Calls On Worldwide Emissaries To Have Courage in Wake of Mumbai Attack

11/25/2008
Assistant Managing Editor
As they mourned a rabbi and his wife murdered by terrorists in Mumbai, officials of the Chabad Lubavitch worldwide outreach movement were encouraging their emissaries in other parts of the world to stay strong and continue their mission. "You know how to face adversity and challenges," said Rabbi Yehuda Krinsky at a press conference in Crown Heights Brooklyn that was televised around the world. " Keep strong and continue to forge ahead with courage and fortitude in the service of our people and mankind to make this a better place to live for all."

Triple Threat

07/30/2008

Assistant Managing Editor
When an elderly immigrant client walked into the offices of the Council of Jewish Organizations of Flatbush this week, she was told the case worker who was to attend a city benefits hearing with her would not be able to do so. The worker has been laid off, one of seven employees at the agency affected by a 20 percent cut in city funding.

NYANA To Close After Long Run Here

06/25/2008

Assistant Managing Editor
After nearly 60 years of helping Jewish refugees find better lives in New York, an agency that at its peak aided some 50,000 clients in one year is expected to shut its doors this summer as a result of a dwindling case load and difficulty in competing for social service contracts. The New York Association for New Americans was founded in 1949 as part of the Jewish community’s efforts to absorb tens of thousands who fled persecution and chaos, mostly from the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. The refugees were brought to America by the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society.

Community Fearing Steep Cuts To Elderly

06/18/2008
Assistant Managing Editor
When Anna, a 93-year-old Holocaust survivor who lives alone in the Bronx despite numerous health problems, couldn’t leave the house one recent afternoon, she dialed the number she knew best in hopes of getting a hot, kosher meal delivered.
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