Law

AMIA Bombing Remembered

03/29/2002
Staff Writer
Last Monday morning, as the digital clock atop the Itau bank building that towers over the tree-lined park across from the steps of the Supreme Court read 9:53, a few tears fell from a cloudy sky. A crowd of some 150 people, huddled around a man at the edge of the park in front of a microphone, fell silent. It was time for Memoria Activa.

A Moving Experience

03/01/2002
Staff Writer
Alan Rubin has always worn a kipa, but he says it’s bigger these days. His wife, Debi, has always dressed modestly, but she says she dresses more modestly these days. The couple has always found time for their five children, but they say they find more time these days. These days are the six months since Sept. 11, 2001. The Rubins, who live in Elizabeth, N.J., say they have been on a spiritual journey since 9-11, a path that will end this summer in Jerusalem. The Rubins are making aliyah — because of 9-11.

Vitebsk Returns To Manhattan

03/01/2002
Staff Writer
It’s not in Kansas anymore. Marc Chagall’s “Study for Over Vitebsk,” an 8-by-10-inch oil painting valued at $1 million that was stolen from The Jewish Museum last year, returned for a day to the East Side Jewish institution last week. It had turned up at a post office in Minnesota and was shipped to Topeka, where it was first identified. The painting was later authenticated by Bella Meyer (pictured), granddaughter of the late, Vitebsk-born artist.

New WJC Exec: Lauder To Head Restitution Effort

08/24/2007
Staff Writer
The new top leadership team of the embattled World Jewish Congress will head to Eastern Europe soon to re-energize stalled negotiations over Holocaust-era restitution payments, Michael Schneider, the group’s next secretary general, said this week. The political discussions will represent a return by the WJC, perceived as rudderless in recent years, to the activity that cemented its reputation as a representative of Jewish interests.

Gentrification Eats Up Kosher Bakery

06/22/2007
Staff Writer
A cup of coffee and a Danish. For the last 20 years, lunchtime for Rabbi T. has meant a two-and-a-half block walk from one Lower East Side institution, Mesivta Tifereth Jerusalem, the yeshiva where he teaches Talmud, to Gertel’s, a kosher bakery where he buys a snack and sits at a small table, reviewing a Hebrew text. (Many members of the haredi community are publicity-shy.) Starting Monday, Rabbi T. will have to get his lunch somewhere else.

Gaza War Still Strains Israel-Turkey Relations

10/14/2009
Staff Writer

Just days before the two countries were to participate in a NATO military exercise this week, Turkish officials informed Israel that it would not be allowed to participate. The U.S., the Netherlands and Italy then withdrew in protest and the exercise was canceled.

Turkey, one of the few Muslim nations to have diplomatic relations with Israel, has had a testy relationship with the Jewish state since January.

former Israeli Foreign Minister Tzipi Livni and Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu

J Street Facing Stiff Challenges Amid Rapid Rise

As attacks continue, new pro-Israel, pro-peace process group seeks to arouse a Jewish silent majority

10/14/2009
Washington correspondent

Delegates to the upcoming national conference by J Street, the group that has become the favorite target of a furious pro-Israel establishment, will face both their organization’s exhilarating rise — and eroding commitment to Israel-related issues by the very Jews it hopes to attract to its ranks.

Jeremy Ben-Ami

Cemetery Settlement Praised

01/28/2005
Staff Writer
The Westchester Jewish community this week praised a $100,000 settlement between a New Jersey real estate developer and the state attorney general that will create a memorial in Yonkers at the site of a shopping center garage built over an abandoned Jewish cemetery. According to the agreement announced Monday by Attorney General Eliot Spitzer, the state will use the settlement to erect a memorial to the Congregation of the People of Righteousness cemetery near the Costco and Home Depot along the state Thruway.

JCCs And The Gender Pay Gap

04/26/2002
Staff Writer
If you go to your local Jewish community center, the employees you meet there are more involved in Jewish life and more likely to stay at their job than their counterparts in recent decades. But if the employee you meet is a woman, she probably earns a smaller salary than a man in a comparable position. Those are among the findings of “Centering on Professionals: The 2001 Study of JCC Personnel in North America,” a study of some 1,800 JCC staffers released this week by the Florence G. Heller-JCC Association Research Center.
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