Labor

Peaceful Sarajevo

The capital of Bosnia-Herzegovina is safe, restored and beautiful.

04/07/2010
Travel Writer

A few weeks ago, writing about Belfast, I was reminded of another delightful, little-touristed European city whose recent past is marked by religious/ethnic strife.

That city is Sarajevo, the capital of Bosnia and Herzegovina. It is sad and telling that the top “Frequently Asked Question” on Bosnia’s tourism Web site is: “Isn’t there still a war in Bosnia?”

A footbridge in the old city of Mostar, a few hours south of Sarajevo.

Gaza on Washington Square

Demonstrating NYU students graft Gaza demands
onto their protest; campus bracing for
upcoming Israel Apartheid Week.

02/27/2009
Editorial Intern

The students’ demands, at first glance, seemed like standard-issue ones: a tuition freeze, requests for budget transparency, student representation on the board of trustees, and fair labor contracts for all employees.
But the 64 New York University students who barricaded themselves inside a cafeteria for two days last week had two other demands, that seemed out of left field: Provide 13 Palestinian students from Gaza with scholarships to the university, and donate all excess supplies to rebuild the University of Gaza, damaged in Israel’s recent war against Hamas.

Protestor Farah Khimji addressed the crowd of students with her in the Kimmel Center cafeteria last week. At one point more than

'Main Street USA,' Just Across the River

The Jews of Roosevelt Island like the
small-town feel of their outpost.

04/01/2010
Editorial Intern

Talk about a Jewish diaspora.
Cut off from the Manhattan mainland and its very Jewish heartbeat, the Jews of Roosevelt Island may be the least-known Jewish community in the area.
Which is OK by them.

Rabbi Zalman and Nechama Duchman and their children. The Chabad emissaries settled in Roosevelt Island four years ago.

Keeping Pace With Nature's Fury

As a succession of disasters strike, Jewish relief organizations struggle to raise enough funds to respond.

09/12/2008
Editorial Intern

Almost four years after the 2004 tsunami in South Asia, one of the deadliest natural disasters in history, relief and rebuilding efforts in the affected areas are far from over.
But in the years since, disasters and crises in other areas of the world have also demanded attention and humanitarian aid, including the cyclone in Burma and the earthquake in Sichuan, China, both of which hit in May of this year, and more recently the war in South Ossetia, Georgia. Add to that the damage on U.S. soil from a succession of tropical storms and hurricanes.

When A Kosher Conversion Isn’t Enough

Local haredi rabbis seen as marriage impediment in latest “who is a Jew” dust-up.

03/31/2010
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — In November 2009, exactly three months before the day they were planning to get married, Maxim and Alina Surdikov went to the marriage registry in the coastal town of Ashkelon, their hometown, just as the laws requires.

The registrar pleasantly told them that before the young couple could open a file (known as a “teek”), they would have to receive permission from the town’s rabbi, Haim Blau.

The reason: Alina Surdikov, 24, who immigrated to Israel from Siberia 15 years ago, is a convert.

Maxim and Alina Surdikov petitioning High Court after Ashkelon rabbi refused to grant marriage license.

Greenfield's Harvest

Newest City Council member marks his victory, but has some powerful enemies.

03/29/2010
Assistant Managing Editor

In his decisive victory in last week's hotly contested City Council race in Brooklyn, David Greenfield made good use of some powerful friends who helped him carry the day.

They included former Mayor Ed Koch, and Sen. Joe Lieberman, whose endorsements gave his candidacy credibility; Sephardic community leaders who quickly filled his campaign coffers; Brooklyn's Democrat chair, Vito Lopez, who provided ground troops to get out the vote, and Mark Botnick, a former aide to Michael Bloomberg, who helped corral the mayor's endorsement.

City Council winner has powerful friends, enemies

When A Kosher Conversion Isn't Enough

Local haredi rabbis seen as marriage impediment in latest "who is a Jew" dust-up.

03/29/2010
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem - In November 2009, exactly three months before the day they were planning to get married, Maxim and Alina Surdikov went to the marriage registry in the coastal town of Ashkelon, their hometown, just as the laws requires.

The registrar pleasantly told them that before the young couple could open a file (known as a "teek"), they would have to receive permission from the town's rabbi, Haim Blau.

The reason: Alina Surdikov, 24, who immigrated to Israel from Siberia 15 years ago, is a convert.

From Yemen To Monsey, A Freedom Journey

Yemenites here marking first Passover in America, but the adjustment isn't easy.

03/29/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

 This is the first Passover when Temia and her daughters won't be grinding wheat by hand and baking matzah in special wood-burning ovens, as they did in Yemen. Instead, they'll be tasting their first matzahs sold in a box, celebrating the holiday in their new homes in upstate Rockland County.

Yemeni men learning English

Health Care Vote Could Mean Tough Campaign for Some Jewish Dems

03/28/2010
JTA

WASHINGTON (JTA) -- A window was shattered by a pellet gun in an apparent vandalism attack at her Tucson district office. Sarah Palin has put her on the list of Democratic lawmakers she is targeting this fall. Arizona Tea Party activists are pledging to help defeat her bid for re-election.

All this because Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.) voted for health care reform.

Giffords is one of a few Jewish Democrats political observers say could have a difficult re-election campaign because of her vote for the controversial Democratic-backed health care bill.

Syndicate content