Human Interest

Rabbi Lookstein Remembers It Well

06/11/2008
Associate Editor

Rabbi Haskel Lookstein is on the phone to another rabbi, trying to get him to help process “some wonderful candidates for conversion” the following Sunday. The Israeli chief rabbinate had pushed for narrower straits for converts to pass through, and the Rabbinical Council of America, Rabbi Lookstein’s group, went along with it.

Settlers Are People, Too

Wednesday, August 5th, 2009

I want to share a letter I received from a reader regarding the portrayal of Jewish residents of Judea and Samaria. The writer’s son and family are longtime residents of Itamar, in the Samarian mountains near Nablus.

 

George W. Bush for — get this — Mideast envoy?

Wednesday, July 29th, 2009 In the craziest-idea-of-the-month sweepstakes,, this one can’t help but come up a winner. Writing in Newsweek, Gregory Levey suggests replacing U.S. special Mideast envoy with – are you ready for this – former President George W. Bush.

For Jewish Doctors, A ‘Relatively’ Welcome School

07/01/2009
Staff Writer

When Peter Barland was applying to medical schools 54 years ago, his choices were severely limited — most top universities still capped their Jewish admittances through strict quotas, and winning a seat at such coveted institutions as Harvard, Yale or Columbia was next to impossible. 

Minnesota Supreme Court rules, Coleman’s toast, Franken to be seated

Tuesday, June 30th, 2009 Eight months after Minnesota voters went to the polls, the state is about to get a new senator. And it’s not the old one – Norm Coleman, the Republican whose last appeal of the razor-thin election was rejected by the Minnesota Supreme Court on Tuesday in a unanimous decision. A lower court ruled that Democrat Al Franken, the former Saturday Night Live comic, won the election by 312 votes, but Coleman continued to argue that an additional 4000 absentee ballots should be counted.

Did we learn the real lessons of the Madoff ripoff?

Tuesday, June 30th, 2009 So Ponzi king Bernie Madoff has been sentenced to 150 years, and the blogosphere is aflame with the outrage and anguish of the victims of this record-breaking swindler. While significant recovery seems unlikely for most, there’s a degree of satisfaction that he didn’t get away with the usual wrist-slapping white collar sentence. But to me some of the case’s most important questions remain unanswered.

Sammy's Menorah Auction Blues

There were many items being auctioned off recently at the Radisson Martinique Hotel in Koreatown: Lot 114, "A Large and Important Brass Chanukkah Lamp" from 18th century Italy (estimated selling price: $16,000 to $24,000); Lot 148, a silver Megillah case, "probably India," circa 1840 ($12,000 to $18,000); Lot 86, a painted wood ad for Dubek cigarettes from Palestine, circa 1930 ($2,000 to $3,500).

Fatherhood

Wednesday, June 17th, 2009

I often think I should have jumped into the lake after him.

 

My son was 12 years old at the time, leaning a bit too far out when he cast his fishing rod. Maybe he did it on purpose.

 

When Zachary hit the lake he was only a foot from the boat dock, in water barely over his head, and easily within reach for me to pull him back up. There was no current, and with his swimming skills, he probably could have chosen to do a few laps to the floating dock and back, fully clothed, before he climbed out of the water.

Pride of PLACE

05/20/2009
Staff Writer

In San Francisco, the Castro district teems with gay life — there are drag shows, gay-run boutiques and the signature of the gay rights movements — the rainbow flag — seems to be everywhere.

Etai Pinkas
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