Hospitality

Repeal The Blaine Amendment

Special To The Jewish Week
01/16/2009
Repealing or ignoring the last remaining vestige of bigotry contained in the New York State Constitution, the so-called “Blaine” amendment, could open the door to providing parents with children attending religious schools — Jewish, Roman Catholic, Lutheran and Greek Orthodox — with the same approximate $8,500 annually per pupil that charter schools receive, all deducted from the budget of the local school district that the charter school pupils would otherwise attend.

The Starbucks Rebbe

Staff Writer
01/16/2009
At Francis Lewis High School on Utopia Parkway in Flushing, Queens, the hallways ring with calls of “L’Chaims” and “Mazel Tov” from the jean-clad, largely non-Jewish teenagers watching as Rabbi Steven Burg, dressed in a suit and a yarmulke, ambles along with his rabbinic colleagues carrying pizza, donuts and Coke. Together the rabbis enter a classroom, bearing food and Jewish lessons for a meeting of the Jewish Student Union, a national project that hopes to bring a measure of Judaism to unaffiliated students in public schools.

The Starbucks Rebbe

Staff Writer
01/16/2009
At Francis Lewis High School on Utopia Parkway in Flushing, Queens, the hallways ring with calls of “L’Chaims” and “Mazel Tov” from the jean-clad, largely non-Jewish teenagers watching as Rabbi Steven Burg, dressed in a suit and a yarmulke, ambles along with his rabbinic colleagues carrying pizza, donuts and Coke. Together the rabbis enter a classroom, bearing food and Jewish lessons for a meeting of the Jewish Student Union, a national project that hopes to bring a measure of Judaism to unaffiliated students in public schools.

The Fire Last Time - Part 2

Thursday, May 28th, 2009 (Here’s another look back at the aftermath of the previous attack by Islamic radicals in Riverdale)   May 20, 2003   A Fire Next Time   The sentencing of an Arab who tried to bomb a Riverdale synagogue brings fears to surface.   Jonathan Mark - Associate Editor   Khaled J., leaning against a wall in the gloomy light of the Bronx County Courthouse, says he has nothing against Jews.  

Repeal The Blaine Amendment

The $8,500 in NY state aid per pupil attending charter schools should also be available to parents of religious school students.

01/16/2009
Special To The Jewish Week
Repealing or ignoring the last remaining vestige of bigotry contained in the New York State Constitution, the so-called “Blaine” amendment, could open the door to providing parents with children attending religious schools — Jewish, Roman Catholic, Lutheran and Greek Orthodox — with the same approximate $8,500 annually per pupil that charter schools receive, all deducted from the budget of the local school district that the charter school pupils would otherwise attend.

The Starbucks Rebbe

Rabbi Steven Burg reaches out to unaffiliated teens wherever they are — public schools or a certain coffee joint.

01/16/2009
Staff Writer
At Francis Lewis High School on Utopia Parkway in Flushing, Queens, the hallways ring with calls of “L’Chaims” and “Mazel Tov” from the jean-clad, largely non-Jewish teenagers watching as Rabbi Steven Burg, dressed in a suit and a yarmulke, ambles along with his rabbinic colleagues carrying pizza, donuts and Coke. Together the rabbis enter a classroom, bearing food and Jewish lessons for a meeting of the Jewish Student Union, a national project that hopes to bring a measure of Judaism to unaffiliated students in public schools.

Mixed Signs On West Bank After Spike in Violence

Despite the calls for revenge, Nablus residents are not eager to resume the militarized uprising against Israel.

12/30/2009
Israel correspondent

Tapuach Junction, West Bank — Just two days after a spike in Israeli-Palestinian violence, the bipolar mood at this crossroads was startling.

On the southbound side of the road, soldiers at a checkpoint were pulling over more Palestinian motorists than usual for spot checks — a sign of heightened security.

01top-0101.gif

WEB EXCLUSIVE: Fracas In The East Village

08/06/2008
Staff Writer
At 7:20 p.m. on Monday, only nine people had shown up for the 7:15 Mincha service at Anshei Meseritz synagogue, a crumbling relic from the turn of the last century that sits directly across the street from the Village View public housing project in Lower Manhattan. Past the sheaths of peeling gray paint and decaying stained glass Stars of David, the shul’s inside houses dysfunctional toilets are said to be more frequently visited by rats than humans.

For Sephardic Students, A Sense Of Empowerment

02/20/2008
Editorial Intern
Winding her way through the rustic streets of Rome, a young Israeli student enters the pillared halls of La Sapienza University, where she will learn about viruses, participate in gross anatomy and study clinical procedure — all in a foreign language.    Hilla Werner-Zafrani, 29, is a third-year medical school student at La Sapienza, where she is training to become an oncologist. Originally from a poor Moroccan family of 10 children, she grew up enduring constant ethnic discrimination and financial burdens in Israel.   

Birthright: Battered But Resilient

01/31/2003
Staff Writer
Working as a bouncer at an East Side bar with a predominantly black and Latino clientele, Michael Isaacs was surprised one night this fall to notice a predominantly Jewish crowd entering the club. To show his "solidarity," Isaacs (a burly, chain-smoking Long Island native who recently completed a two-year stint as a combat medic in the U.S. Army) took out his chai pendant, the Jewish symbol of life. Within minutes, a stranger with an Israeli accent approached Isaacs, 26, asking him if he was Jewish and if he wanted to go to Israel for free.
Syndicate content