Hospitality

Mondrowitz Extradition Ruling Raising Questions

Israeli Supreme Court decision leaves child advocates angry;
decision focusing attention on time elapsed between extradition requests.

01/28/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

The Israeli Supreme Court’s recent ruling that alleged child molester Avrohom Mondrowitz could not be extradited to the U.S. has generated strong reactions from child advocates here and in Israel, and raised questions from legal experts about both the ruling itself and how the case unfolded over the past 25 years.

Alleged child molester Avrohom Mondrowitz during his arrest in Israel in 2007. Getty Images

Israel And The Tylenol Scare Of ‘82

A PR expert on the Goldstone report, Haiti and what Israel should learn about controlling its message.

01/28/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

In October of 1982, seven people in Chicago died under what at first seemed mysterious circumstances but quickly became linked to cyanide-laced Tylenol that had been placed on drugstore shelves. At the time Tylenol had a whopping 37 percent share of the painkiller market.

I mention it now, in the context of public relations for Israel, because the Tylenol Crisis, as it is called in the industry, is universally considered a benchmark case to study in terms of response to the kind of negative public relations that could have forced the company to fold.

Supreme Court campaign finance decision and Jewish clout

I had a bunch of calls and emails in the wake of yesterday's blockbuster Supreme Court decision on corporate political contributions basically asked the same question: what does it mean for Jewish political clout?

The decision overturned a half-century-old ban on using corporate money to endorse political candidates – or to oppose them.  The rationale of the Court's majority:  corporations basically have the same free speech rights as individuals.

No Energy Crisis Here

Special To The Jewish Week
12/25/2009

One morning this past July, I visited the bet midrash (study hall) of Yeshivat Hadar in Manhattan. Nearly 50 young people were there, spending their summer in serious engagement with Jewish texts. The room pulsated with the vitality of a traditional yeshiva and the intellectual openness of a university.

Painting The Church-State Line

Left, right and a range of faiths join for statement clarifying where the law stands on religious expression.

01/22/2010
JTA

Washington — The Anti-Defamation League and the Southern Baptist Convention may butt heads over where the line ultimately should be drawn on the separation of church and state, but representatives of both organizations say they agree on where the law now stands — and with more than two dozen other experts they have come together to help explain it to the rest of the country.

After nearly four years of work, the organizational representatives have issued a 32-page document titled “Religious Expression in American Public Life: A Joint Statement of Current Law.”

Written in a question-and-answer format and including extensive endnotes, the document explains the state of the law on religious expression, answering queries such as “Are individuals and groups permitted to use government property for religious activities and events?” “May employees express and exercise their faith within secular nongovernmental workplaces?” and “Does the First Amendment place restrictions on the political activities of religious organizations?”

Marc Stern of the American Jewish Congress, left, and the OU’s Nathan Diament helped draft the new 32-page document.

Mondrowitz May Have Been Treating Boys Long After Indictment

New evidence suggests alleged child molester was counseling teen in Israel
in 2006; child porn seen on his computer.

01/21/2010
Staff Writer

Special To The Jewish Week
With alleged Brooklyn child molester Avrohom Mondrowitz under house arrest until Jan. 24 following last week’s decision by the Israeli Supreme Court to deny his extradition to the U.S., new evidence has emerged that appears to indicate that Mondrowitz was treating adolescent boys in Israel as recently as 2006.

Avrohom Mondrowitz being led away in handcuffs during his 2007 arrest in Israel.

When Religion Is Used as a Cudgel

02/25/2008
Special to the Jewish Week

The one-two punch of Debra Nussbaum Cohen’s front-page article in The Jewish Week (RCA Seen Caving on Conversions, February 29) and Gershom Gorenberg’s piece in the Sunday Magazine of The New York Times (Proving You’re a Jew, March 2) serves as a painful reminder of one of Israel’s most vexing problems.

Israel After Bush

05/16/2008
Special to the Jewish Week

Now that the love-fest is over and President Bush has “left the building,” so to speak, Israelis are left to ponder life after him. The conference on tomorrow organized by Shimon Peres afforded the Israeli government the chance to say thank you to the man who has been, in his gut, arguably the most sympathetically inclined towards Israel’s precarious security position of any American president in recent memory.

The Question Of Community

03/06/2009

"What indeed is "community"?


Are we bound together by common purposes and goals? (This approach is beloved by the community organizers.) Or is there something deeper, more intimate, in the idea of community, something that reaches down to family? In this construct, the community provides the individual much of what the family provides; it’s the idea of kinship.

Army To Chabad Rabbi: Get A Shave!

Menachem Stern’s beard stands in between him and his goal of becoming a military chaplain.

01/14/2010
Staff Writer

Born into a Chabad Lubavitch family, Rabbi Menachem Stern grew up with one ambition in life: to help people.
“Throughout my life I have pursued this goal by engaging in many different activities, ranging from visiting Jewish inmates in prisons to visiting the sick in hospitals and nursing homes,” he wrote in a short essay.
When he spotted an ad in August 2008 for military chaplains, Rabbi Stern said, “I knew I had found my calling.”

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