Education

Stanford Getting $12 Million For Jewish Doctoral program

05/11/2010

(JTA) — The Jim Joseph Foundation will give Stanford University $12 million to renew its Jewish education studies department.

The funding for the California university’s School of Education will create a doctoral concentration in education and Jewish studies, and establish and endow a Jim Joseph professorship in education and Jewish studies.

The gift is the largest in the history of Stanford’s School of Education.

Bye Bye Boobies

05/11/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

When the going gets tough, DJ Jensen throws parties.

And so, on the eve of DJ’s prophylactic double mastectomy to ward off breast cancer last year, she could be found grinning in a room festooned with padded bras and balloon bouquets, savoring a breast-shaped red velvet cake, surrounded by women she loved. Like the guests, DJ wore pink. Her T-shirt read, “Shh. Don’t Say Anything. They Don’t Know Yet.”

Should I be concerned about my kid's non-Jewish friend?

05/10/2010
Special to the Jewish Week

Q. My daughter, 10, goes to a Jewish day school, but her best friend is a non-Jewish neighbor. Should I be concerned? What should I tell her?

A. There might be underlying reason for concern, though not specifically because her BFF isn’t an MOT (Member of the Tribe).

Rabbi Joshua Hammerman

A Conversation With Hila Ratzabi

Twenty-eight-year-old poet Hila Ratzabi has the kind of credentials Jewish leaders like to tout as the surefire antidote to intermarriage: 12 years of Jewish day school followed by four years in the Jewish Theological Seminary/Barnard College undergraduate double-degree program.

The daughter of an Israeli father and American Jewish mom, Ratzabi always assumed she would marry a Jewish man. But in the year and a half since she met her Mexican-American (Baptist-raised) atheist boyfriend José, a grad student in chemistry, Ratzabi, who has an MFA in writing from Sarah Lawrence College, has been questioning her long-held assumptions about intermarriage and eagerly reading stories of how other people have negotiated interfaith relationships.

Technology and Jewish Education Conference

Jewish techie Ari Davidow listened in on JESNA's recent "Technology and Jewish Education" conference and posted some of his observations on the Jewish Women's Archive blog. JESNA's conference is run through its Lippman Kanfer Institute.

Technology and Jewish Education

Gag Rule For Gentiles

Interfaithfamily.com has published a very disturbing personal essay by a mom who wasn’t allowed to speak from the bima at her daughter’s bat mitzvah.

The essay by Debbie Burton doesn’t say how long ago the incident occurred, but the gag rule for gentiles remains in place at her Chicago congregation, which she describes as an independent lay-led minyan that relies on “Conservative legal opinions.” (To learn more about independent minyanim, which vary tremendously in their overall outlooks as well as their approaches toward interfaith families, read my colleague Rivka Oppenheim's excellent recent article or go to the Mechon Hadar Web site.)

Vacation In Israel, Come Home Cured

Low-cost, quality care — and possibly
U.S. health reforms — seen leading more
Western patients to seek out procedures in Israel.

Staff Writer
05/05/2010

 Rachel and her partner had been contemplating artificial insemination for years, but they didn’t actually go ahead with the process until Rachel came to Jerusalem from New York for a one-year teaching fellowship. After some encouragement from another couple that had gone through the process, the decision was clear: they would create their child in Israel, at Hadassah Medical Center in Mount Scopus.

Patients consult with a doctor in the waiting room of Assuta Medical Center in Tel Aviv, which has become one of many Israeli hu

Relaxed Breast Cancer Guidelines Criticized In Community

Gap years in new government rules seen as particular concern for Jewish women.

Special To The Jewish Week
05/05/2010

 Mention the new breast cancer guidelines, and D.J. Schneider Jensen utters a single syllable of disgust. “Uhk!” Like many Jewish women who carry a BRCA genetic mutation or have a personal history of breast cancer, Jensen was appalled by controversial recommendations issued five months ago by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force of the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. The new guidelines advise against mammograms until the age of 50, and against teaching self breast exams to women

Rochelle Shoretz, a breast cancer survivor who founded the Sharsheret advocacy organization.

Full-Time Teachers: Can The Model Catch On?

Following Central Synagogue’s lead, more local congregations hoping to upgrade Hebrew-school staff.

05/05/2010
Associate Editor

 In a Midtown room, several 20-somethings are gathered around a scuffed-up table. With papers, cell phones and various caffeinated beverages before them, they enthusiastically brainstorm together and critique each other’s work. 

A workshop for young writers or artists? No, this is the weekly meeting of Central Synagogue’s 10 full-time Hebrew school teachers.

Afternoon Hebrew schools, despite competition from day schools and private tutors, continue to be the venues where the majority of American Jewish kids get their religious education. 

Full-time Hebrew school teachers Greg Weitzmann, Toba Strauss and Arielle Garelleck in a weekly planning meeting.
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