Education

Westchesterís ëGolden Ageí

08/15/2003
Associate Editor
Suddenly in Jewish Westchester, land of spacious homes and ample backyards, nothing seems to fit. Westchesterís Jews, once limited by upper-crust restrictions, are experiencing a 40-percent population surge in the past 10 years, only to find that their infrastructure of schools and shuls now seems too small, tight around the seams.

A Rich Education

01/07/1999
Staff Writer
An influx of grants in the last two years has uplifted the learning experience at Temple Beth Israel. Figure things now to get downright exhilarating. The 225-family Conservative congregation in Port Washington has received a $500,000 donation to enhance Jewish programing in what it is believed to be the largest gift of its kind. "It will enable us to hire someone with top credentials in Jewish education to turn us upside down and reassemble everything in a new and exciting way," said Rabbi Toni Shy.

Making A Better Place

07/01/1998
Staff Writer
With her 10-year-old son at her side, a disabled widow from Long Beach told a hushed group of 500 UJA-Federation lay and professional leaders that the local Jewish community center has "been there for us in the very darkest of times." "I have an immune disease called fibromyalga," explained Harriet Cohen, 46, at the annual Long Island General Assembly in Roslyn, which provides UJA-Federation-funded organizations an opportunity to display their activities.

At Hicksville seminar on acceptance, Solomon Schechter High students learn 'you can't take words back.'

02/06/1998
Staff Writer
Nicole Simon, a 10th-grader at the Solomon Schechter High School in Hicksville, was shocked and hurt recently when she boarded the school bus and a seventh-grader called her a "nigger." "I didn't know what to do," said the West Hempstead student. "The older kids on the bus had told him that to be cool at high school it was cool to say nigger. I was never called a nigger before. I was appalled."

'Undoing Damage' Of Welfare Reform

12/19/1997
Staff Writer
Saying the last 18 months have been one of the "saddest chapters in our country's history," the executive vice president of UJA-Federation detailed his organization's struggle to deal with the impact of welfare reform. "I can report to you the panic that ensued" as legal immigrants here more than five years realized they would lose Supplemental Security Income, Medicaid and food stamps, Stephen Solender told a recent UJA-Federation-sponsored legislative breakfast.

RJC, NJDC weigh in on health reform. But where are the Jews?

Thursday, August 13th, 2009 So what do you suppose the Republican Jewish Coalition, a group’s that’s partisan with a capital “P,” thinks about the Democrats’ health insurance reform plans and the administration’s strong support? C’mon, take a wild guess. Stumped?  They’re against it, just about as much as the National Jewish Democratic Council (NJDC) is for it. This is what the RJC had to say in an action alert today today:

California Dreaming: Let’s hope it’s not contagious

Friday, July 31st, 2009 The Wall Street Journal ran this headline yesterday:  “Gov. Schwarzenegger’s Approval Rating Hits Record Low.” Californians, it turns out,  aren’t happy with his role in a budget crisis that brought the state to the brink of bankruptcy and will now produce record cuts to an an already-pared back education system and benefits to the poor, the elderly and the sick.

Are Lay Leaders Fiddling While Yeshivas Burn?

Tuesday, July 14th, 2009

The lack of sustainability of what is now a $2 billion educational system that caters primarily to middle-class and lower-class students should have been anticipated long ago, when the number of kids in private Jewish schools began to skyrocket, as far back as the 1950s.

 

A Divorce in the Birthright Family

Top trip provider severs ties, saying his ‘marry Jewish’ message is being stifled.

07/10/2009
Staff Writer
Oranim’s “Momo” Lifshitz: Agenda at odds with Birthright?“Momo” Lifshitz is a legendary figure among Birthright Israel participants, a larger-than-life symbol of the free 10-day trip that more than 200,000 diaspora Jews have used to jumpstart their Jewish identities.

For Jewish Doctors, A ‘Relatively’ Welcome School

07/01/2009
Staff Writer

When Peter Barland was applying to medical schools 54 years ago, his choices were severely limited — most top universities still capped their Jewish admittances through strict quotas, and winning a seat at such coveted institutions as Harvard, Yale or Columbia was next to impossible. 

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