Breast Cancer

Study: Test All Women Of Ashkenazi Descent For BRCA Defect

09/08/2014
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Jerusalem — All women of Ashkenazi descent should be screened from age 30 for the BRCA gene mutation that causes breast cancer, an Israeli study recommends.

The Big BRCA Questions

Panel moderated by Barbara Walters discusses the benefits and perils of early detection of breast and ovarian cancer.

10/16/2013
Jewish Week Correspondent
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If you were at a higher risk for cancer, would you want to know about it? How early? And what preventative measures would be worth the financial cost and emotional strain?

‘There Were Still Choices I Could Make’

Alice Hoffman’s breast cancer memoir is really a guide for going through difficult times.

10/16/2013
Jewish Week Book Critic
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Being a caregiver came much more naturally to Alice Hoffman than being cared for. For decades, the bestselling novelist was the one who took friends and relatives to the doctor, sat at bedsides, thoroughly researched diseases and arranged for cemetery plots and funerals. Fifteen years ago, when she found a lump on her breast, she was certain that she only imagined it, as things like that didn’t happen to her, and she didn’t have time to be ill. But a call from her doctor, “Alice, I’m sorry,” brought the stark truth.

"I could not run away from my circumstances, or control the path of my disease," Hoffman says. Photo courtesy Algonquin

Understanding Angelina’s `Jewish Gene’

05/19/2013
Special To The Jewish Week

Celebrity Angelina Jolie's recent decision to opt for prophylactic surgery after she determined she is a carrier of a mutation in the BRCA1 gene has prompted media attention the world over. Media descriptions of her “Jewish gene”, however, are misguided. 

As Angelina Jolie has found, you don't have to be of Jewish descent to carry the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes.

In the war on breast cancer, Israel leads

11/01/2010
JTA

JERUSALEM (JTA) -- Irit Paneth, in and out of remission from breast cancer for more than a decade, was among the thousands who wound their way like a giant pink-and-white ribbon through Jerusalem's streets in the first Susan G. Komen Foundation’s Race for the Cure held in Israel.

"What's important here is to raise awareness," Paneth said during the Oct. 28 march, wearing the pink T-shirt reserved for breast cancer survivors.

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