Blogs
Posted: Wed, 05/14/2014 - 07:00 | The New Normal

Editor's Note: Jonah Selber's experience is an inspiring story -- he has received the vocational and housing support that he needed to succeed. This feature is the start of a monthly series in which "The New Normal" will share about a person living successfully in a different kind of housing model for people with disabilities.

Jonah Selber, who was born with a developmental disability, is a longtime, successful employee of Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals in Philadelphia where he serves as an office assistant in the Information Systems Department. He loves his job and never takes it for granted. Unlike 70 percent of working age Americans with disabilities who are out of the workforce, Jonah has been working for 17 years delivering important business documents and greeting customers in the Information Systems service center at one of the nation’s top hospitals.

Posted: Tue, 05/13/2014 - 15:03 | Political Insider

Ronald Reagan once explained a dispute within his party as "Sometimes our right hand doesn't know what our far right hand is doing."

That helps explain how today's Republicans are dealing with immigration reform.

A comprehensive bipartisan bill passed the Senate last year and there was a feeling of momentum since the GOP's post-2012 "autopsy" of its defeat concluded it needed immigration reform to attract Hispanic voters, who had given Barack Obama 72 percent of their votes.

Posted: Mon, 05/12/2014 - 17:24 | Well Versed

"The Red Tent" is becoming a miniseries. And it's about time.

Posted: Mon, 05/12/2014 - 11:42 | Well Versed

Yiddish was in the air last week in the nation’s capital as the Yiddish Book Center received the 2014 National Medal for Museum and Library Service in a White House ceremony. “Nachas” and “kvelling” were the words that most immediately came to mind for Aaron Lansky, the founder and president of the Center, one of ten U.S. institutions to win the honor.

Posted: Fri, 05/09/2014 - 11:09 | Well Versed

One important feature in the historical works of “ma’asalech” (little stories), written in Yiddish for children, is a practice of “Juda-izing” popular stories. Instead of translating children’s stories into Yiddish, translators would often adapt stories to reflect Jewish society and values. For example, in 1913, a Yiddish version of a Hans Christian Anderson story was “translated” into Yiddish and titled “Big Fievel and Little Fievel.” In this remade version, the main characters were Jewish boys.

Posted: Thu, 05/08/2014 - 07:44 | The New Normal

Editor's Note: In honor of Yom Ha'atzmaut, which fell last week, we are sharing this blog about LOTEM, an innovative program in Israel that organizes outings for people with special needs on nature reserves through the country.

If I had any doubt about the importance of my work as a soldier guide with LOTEM- Making Nature Accessible, yesterday it totally vanished.

It all began when I got on the bus as I do every day when I am guiding, though what awaited me was a surprise. When my face was revealed to the students they began to call out, "You were with us last year," and "I know you" and "Do you remember that we were in the Judean Desert?" The students indeed were not mistaken! One year ago I guided the same group from Shafririm A. School for teenagers with intellectual challenges in the Judean Desert on a two-day hike.