Stories You May Have Missed
04/12/2012 - 09:45
Stewart Ain

A defeated Illinois senatorial candidate this week blamed his last place finish on the fact that a local reporter outed him as an anti-Semite. A Mexican town celebrated Easter last Sunday with a “burning of the Jews” – Jewish effigies representing Judas Iscariot, the disciple who betrayed Jesus at the Last Supper, ultimately leading to his crucifixion.

The Lebanese Web site Al-Manar claimed this week that an Israeli basketball star posted on his Facebook page that “there’s nothing like celebrating Passover with matzah dipped in blood of Christian and Muslim children.”

These are three hard to believe stories I thought should not be missed amid the political, economic, crime and war stories that have dominated the news.
The senatorial candidate who blamed his loss on a reporter was Arthur Jones, a 64-year-old retired insurance salesman from the Chicago suburb of Lyons. Known as the man who organized “celebrations” in local restaurants on Hitler’s birthday, Jones claimed it was reporter Lorraine Swanson who cost him the election by reporting on his longstanding ties to neo-Nazis. In addition, she reported he is a Holocaust denier and that on his campaign Website Jones accused “racist criminal Zionist Israel” of waging war against Christians in Israel.

In an e-mail to Swanson after her article appeared, Jones said she was “very deceptive and cowardly” to suggest he was “campaigning against the Holocaust.”

“I care deeply about the way our country is being manipulated by the Jews and Israeli Lobby toward another war,” he wrote. “Yet you apparently care more about the damn Holocaust liars than you do about your own country. Your treason against America is revolting.”

Swanson, writing in the Oaklawn Patch, quoted him telling her: “As far as I’m concerned, the Holocaust is nothing more than an international extortion racket by the Jews. It’s the blackest lie in history. Millions of dollars are being made by Jews telling this tale of woe and misfortune in books, movies, plays and TV.

The more survivors, the more lies that are told.”

The Times of Israel quoted Jones as admitting that philosophically he is a National Socialist, and that his Website claimed that the U.S. “gives more of our taxes to parasite Israel than any other nation on Earth.”

He also reportedly blames Israel and the American Jewish lobby for devising the 9/11 attacks.

When the ballots were counted, Jones came in last in the three-man race but still managed to amass nearly 4,000 votes.

Then there was a report in the Times of Israel about the annual tradition in Coita, Mexico called the “burning of the Jews.” The paper said it is reminiscent of the fictional “Running of the Jew” in Sacha Baron Cohen’s movie Borat.

The Times quoted a Mexican newspaper, the Chiapas Herald, as saying that the custom in the town was for locals to make Jewish effigies during Holy Week and display them for three days in different locations to illustrate poor conduct. On Easter Sunday, they were paraded through the streets as children collect money to buy flammable materials with which to burn the effigies.

The Mexican newspaper said the custom “strengthens” the culture of the Zoque, locals in southern Mexico who converted to Catholicism. It added that the custom “fosters unity and respect” and “purifies the soul.”

Finally, that Lebanese report about the Israeli basketball star’s Facebook page is true. The Israeli newspaper Haaretz reported that the player, Ido Kozikaro, was arrested by Israeli police because of his action. It said he apologized and was released in his own recognizance.

Kozikaro, who played with Israel’s national team in 2009, was apparently making a joke based on the blood libels made against Jews over the centuries. Not only did authorities not find it amusing, but the Gilboa regional council filed a police complaint that led to his arrest.

Kozikaro is currently playing on the Galil Gilboa team (which is financed fully or in part by the state) and is a resident of a kibbutz in the Galilee.
Al Manar pointed out that 11 of Kozikaro’s friends said they “liked” his posting and that others had commented in an “encouraging” manner. It made no mention of his arrest or the disgust of some of those who read of Kazikaro’s antics. One called it “despicable.”

These were three items you may have missed this week that reveal how some people see us and how we are sometimes our worst enemy.

 

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