Posted: Mon, 04/07/2014 - 00:08 | Posted by: Elizabeth Denlinger | Well Versed
Poster for “Traktorfabrik.” Courtesy of Noemi Schlosser

Keep an eye out for future productions of Noémi Schlosser’s wry theater piece "Traktorfabrik."  I was lucky enough to catch a staged reading of part of it recently as part of the Emerging Artists Theatre’s New Works Series.

Posted: Thu, 04/03/2014 - 23:45 | Posted by: Caroline Lagnado | Well Versed
Installation view of "Other Primary Structures" at The Jewish Museum, New York. David Heald/The Jewish Museum

To celebrate its new exhibit on global minimalist sculpture, “Other Primary Structures,”  The Jewish Museum opened its galleries and hosted a dance party for revelers last week.

Posted: Wed, 04/02/2014 - 11:52 | Posted by: Caroline Lagnado | Well Versed
Installation view of "Other Primary Structures" at The Jewish Museum, New York. Courtesy of David Heald/The Jewish Museum

“Other Primary Structures” at The Jewish Museum can be seen as a nod to the institution’s past. The museum staged a major exhibit of minimalist sculpture called “Primary Structures: Younger American and British Sculptors” in 1966.

Posted: Sun, 03/30/2014 - 09:10 | Posted by: Gloria Kestenbaum | Well Versed
From “Radzyn.” Courtesy Rocket Chair Media

If the creative team of Rocket Chair Media is any indication, the Millennial Generation's approach to the Shoah will be something quite different from what’s come before. The prologue to their new digital epic fantasy “Radzyn” now begins online, with daily installations this week and monthly thereafter.

Posted: Sat, 03/29/2014 - 23:47 | Posted by: Esther Amini | Well Versed
Rita Jahan Farouz. Photo courtesy American Sephardi Federation

For thousands of years Jewish-Iranian women have been forced to hide behind chadors, look down at their feet and not speak unless spoken to.  During ancient Persia and even later day Iran, they lived with two strikes against them: Jewish and female.  They were and still are viewed and treated by Muslims as second class citizens.  Even today, in Iran, a woman, cannot become a judge, regardless of her education, degrees and professional qualifications.  The reason given: “A woman can never be just.”