The very last word on the White House Chanukah party - until tomorrow, maybe
12/16/2009 - 17:10
James Besser

The Great Barack Obama Chanukah Party Wars continued today with angry blogs and op-eds, almost all of  which can be distilled down into two basic positions: either this president dislikes Jews and the guest list is a deliberate snub, or he is set to have the best and most bipartisan White House Chanukah party ever.

I'm guessing tonight's party won't be the end of it.

I particularly enjoyed National Jewish Democratic Council president Marc Stanley's Huffington Post Op-Ed  on "A truly Bipartisan White House Hanukkah Party." 

Among his arguments: “Regardless of the bluster, I want to take this opportunity to congratulate the Obama administration for holding the first White House Hanukkah party where the invite list includes all of the Jewish Democrats and Republicans serving in Congress. In the past when these parties were held, most -- if not all -- Jewish Congressional Democrats were not invited.”

True.  What he neglects to mention: there is only one Jewish Republican in all of Congress – Rep. Eric Cantor (R-Va.), the minority whip. So the White House won't have to order extra hummus to feed Jewish Republicans attending.

Do I detect a sly jab in Stanley's writing about a GOP that can't muster more than a single Jewish lawmaker on Capitol Hill?
 
Over at JTA, Eric Fingerhut has a good item asking this question:
 
“So if President Obama wants to have a more 'intimate' party, or use different language on the invitations, why is it such a big deal? Can't a president create his own traditions for the holiday, just like he implements his own policies?"

Also on the War on Chanukah front, blogger DovBear reminds us of last year's Chanukah party  mishegoss when President George W. Bush, lauded these days by Jewish Republicans as just about the inventor of  the holiday, sent out Chanukah cards to members of the Jewish community – with a pretty Christmas tree illustration.

How soon we forget.

Me, I'm not going to the White House Chanukah party; I wasn't invited.

Comment Guidelines

The Jewish Week feels comments create a valuable conversation and wants to feature your thoughts on our website. To make everyone feel welcome, we won't publish comments that are profane, irrelevant, promotional or make personal attacks.

Add comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
By submitting this form, you accept the Mollom privacy policy.