A Twentysomething Jew Wants To Talk To You
10/05/2012 - 14:15
Noah Yaffe
Moishe House, and havdalah: a solution to a twentysomething's predicament.
Moishe House, and havdalah: a solution to a twentysomething's predicament.

Here's the predicament.

We're in a place long without any structured Judaism, between college communities and settling down into family life. Where do we find our connection with Judaism? When is there time while we're building careers? Why observe Shabbat with secular life laying claim to Friday nights? And with most synagogues lacking a population of young adults, how do we even find peers?

Let me tell you about one solution.

There is this organization called Moishe House, where a group of twenty-something-year-old adults live in a residential home and put on events for their Jewish peers in the area. Shabbat and seders,  yoga and movie nights, soup kitchen volunteering and beach cleanups. All the intriguing activities Moishe House Residents think up become reality. With 50 Houses around the world, all funded locally by wonderful, generous donors, we're filling the generational gap. And having an awesome time doing it!

Personally, I’m a resident in one of the three Los Angeles area Houses, having just moved from the San Francisco Bay Area, where I was born and raised.  At Moishe House LA: San Fernando Valley, my three roommates and I love putting on Shabbat dinners – our favorite event – where twice a month we clean house, cook up a load of delicious food, and host 20 to 50 guests. While some guests join us for every Shabbat and have become family, we’re always excited to welcome new people to all our events! If you’re in your twenties and ever in LA, check out Moishehouse.org to visit one of our events. I’d love to meet you. Check out http://www.moishehouse.org/houses_a.asp?HouseID=69 to learn more about the community I am a part of.

Now, this new blog is not a non-stop advertisement for my personal life or Moishe House by any means. In fact, some of the twenty-something bloggers on The SchmoozeFeed aren't even connected to Moishe House, but I want you to know a little about my background and involvement in Moishe House, including what we're doing and where we're coming from. Take it or leave it, ignorant or wise, our posts are a sneak peak of the coming generation, the one starting to take positions on synagogue boards, serving as rabbis, and organizing communities. As Moishe House residents, we're highly involved with the Jewish world and closely linked with Generation Y Jews.

For the first time, you get to see what we think and how we think. Maybe some of our ideas are foolish and need to be challenged -- you'll certainly have the opportunity. But we also have cutting-edge insights into our generation that you don't want to miss.

What's in it for us? We're looking to define our place in the Jewish world, to find a role in our larger community, and better know ourselves. Not to mention we're all passionate about writing.

I'm thoroughly looking forward to dialoguing with elders, peers, and youth alike. We will share our world view with our parents, converse with our peers, and provide advice to the up and coming younguns (we survived college … so can you!)

So here we are: A group of post-college Jews that have yet to settle down with spouse and synagogue. And we all want to talk with you.

Let's Schmooze!

Noah Yaffe

Comments

Great!

This is great, Noah! What a well-written article.

Dear Noah:

I am a friend of your Aunt Jan's. I am so touched by your article and I hope you continue to explore new ways to be Jewish and live a Jewish life. I respect you highly for living in the Moishe House and sharing your experience!

HI Noah,
Ko'l Hakavod for this terrific article.
I only wish they had a Moishe House for middle aged people. I would sign up for sure. I love the idea of the huge Shabbat dinners and the whole extended family feeling.
I feel very confident about where the eorld is going because people like you are in it.
Shabbat Shalom.
love,
Jan

Noah: We're thrilled about this! Can't wait to see more from you.

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