Week’s end absurdities – 3/4
03/05/2011 - 14:08
Anonymous

I’ve decided that on every weekend from now on I will publish a brief list of some of the most ridiculous things I’ve seen, heard or smelled over the past week. Things that don’t warrant an entire post but encapsulate the eccentric world that is Israeli society.

-Sunday: My brother and I managed to Skype for 2.5 hours, after not getting to speak for a long time. It was quite fun – though I'm trying to figure out what we possibly chatted about for so long. I do hope he finally comes to visit this spring.

-Monday: On my way from to a work meeting in Jerusalem's southeastern Arnona neighborhood, I sat through over an hour-long bus ride to travel the approximately 9-kilometer (5.5-mile) route by bus. I'm really starting to think that walking is pretty much always the best bet in this city, especially if you do not have a car.

-Thursday: Toward the end of a lovely coffee meeting with my friend Raphael, we heard some ambulances blaring from Azza Street, outside the window where we sat. As I have seen all too often lately in Jerusalem, cars essentially ignored the fact that their is an emergency medical vehicle trying to get through behind them, and made little attempt to pull over and let the ambulance through. Imagine this same scenario on a bus-clogged Agripas Street.

-Thursday late afternoon: I now go to the shuk so often to buy my fruits and vegetables (well, mostly vegetables) that I am on a first-name basis with my favorite vendor of tomatoes and cucumbers – Faisel. In the summer, Faisel had told me he spotted me frequently on the bus to Mount Scopus, which initially creeped me out. But recently, after I brought Ravid to the shuk with me, Faisel commented on how "chamoud" (cute) he is and recently started telling me about his girlfriend.

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This entry is cross-posted on Sharon's original "Sacred and Insane" blog. You can reach Sharon at sharon@sharonudasin.com, or follow her on Twitter.

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