What’s The Big Miracle In Seattle?
12/19/2009 - 00:00
Anonymous
Saturday, December 19th, 2009   One response to the Seattle terrorist verdict was to call it another Chanukah miracle. Help me out here, what’s the miracle when a guy is found guilty for shooting five people and killing another, when he admitted it, calling the police himself from the scene of the crime? Is it a miracle in America when should have been an open-and-shut case is finally shut — unlike Lemrick Nelson, found innocent by a jury of his peers that then took him out for dinner, after stabbing Yankel Rosenbaum, or unlike OJ, who’s still looking for the killer after a jury of his peers found him innocent? Will it be a miracle if Khalid Sheikh Mohammed is found innocent or guilty of 9/11 by a jury of his peers in Manhattan? Is this what we’re down to, thinking simple justice a “miracle”? There’s a reason for this, which is that Americans have been whiplashed by Progressives into thinking that no one is really guilty (other than Republicans), certainly not Muslim-Americans, because they have pre-post traumatic stress syndrome, the stress of living in America, or some other such alibi. It’s curious, the rush by some in the media and academia to exonerate the murderous killer in Fort Hood because that doctor was so stressed out by what was happening to his terrorist brothers overseas. but no such forgiveness or mercy for the murderous killer in Hebron, Baruch Goldstein, because that doctor was stressed out by treating dozens of Jewish victims in the intifadah. It would be a miracle if the killers in Seattle and Fort Hood were as famously damned and unforgiven by their fellow citizens to the extent that Baruch Goldstein was famously damned and unforgiven by his.

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