McCain Is Not ‘Good For The Jews’
01/05/2010 - 13:39
Jonathan Mark
Monday, October 20th, 2008 The time has long ago come and gone for John McCain to have brought up Barack Obama’s connections to Jeremiah Wright, William Ayers, Rashid Khalidi, Edward Said and the radical Palestinians at the Chicago-based Electronic Intifada, associations that Obama threw overboard as his campaign evolved. McCain missed that opportunity in the late spring and summer, before the final furlongs when the public demands a summation, a closing and substantive discussion of the most important issues facing the nation.   But if McCain insists on making Ayers a major issue, than he’s losing me for one more reason, among many: As a Jew, I don’t think that I can trust McCain precisely because of his decision not to bring up Wright in the course of this campaign. Not only did he not bring up Wright, he undercut the North Carolina Republicans several months ago when they tried to make Wright an issue, at the height of the controversy.   With all the charges of racism in the air, and if every single criticism of Obama can be twisted into a racist attack (from Hillary being called a racist for saying that LBJ was a major force in the landmark civil rights legislation, to suggesting that there is a substantial racist component to the Jewish vote even though almost 78 percent — a landslide percentage - of Jews are supporting Obama) I’m afraid.   I’m afraid that if America ever goes “Crown Heights” on me, I don’t want a president like John McCain who decides that he is too noble, or too intimidated, to mention Wright or Farrakhan. Hillary bought up Wright and the media did also, as did Saturday Night Live, until McCain made the issue treyf. It’s not that McCain’s silence has inoculated him from being called racist, anyway.   If McCain won’t bring up Wright — a perversely anti-American, pro-Farrakhan, anti-Semitic hate monger, and Obama’s spiritual mentor for 20 years until the heat came – then I don’t trust McCain to speak up on anti-Semitism if it should arise in America, or if the inner cities ever erupt with inner city Jews being targeted. I don’t need a preening moral coward as my president, especially one who confuses that cowardice with self-righteousness. I don’t need a Republican David Dinkins. McCain is a good man with a good heart, but so was Dinkins. A lot of good that did Crown Heights.   The lesson I take away from ten months of silence is that McCain doesn’t have the nerve to be “good for the Jews.” He has less guts than does Hillary, the mainstream media and the late-night comedy shows that his campaign so often derides. They all brought up Wright.   To not bring up Wright is to care what the racist mud slingers will say, but to care “what will the world say?” has been the hallmark of losers, which McCain is turning out to be.   I trust Obama to speak truth to the black community, if it’ll ever come to that. I don’t trust McCain. I don’t think McCain is “good for the Jews.”   (I don’t think Bush was good for the Jews either, if “good for the Jews” meant getting Israel to quit the Hezbollah war because of a stray hit on the Qana apartment house; and it wasn’t “good or the Jews” to push israel to send tea and jam to Shalit’s kidnappers in Gaza, even as rockets rained on Sderot; and it wasn’t “good for the Jews” to deplete the U.S. military and American public spirit in Iraq, in an incompetent war in one country lasting longer a two-ocean, three-continent World War II; and it wasn’t “good for the Jews” to push for a road map when there was no road; and it wasn’t “good for the Jews” to target Iraq instead of Iran; and it wasn’t “good for the Jews” to have an impulsive, inarticulate leader who couldn’t inspire; and I voted for him twice.)   If his campaign is any indication of how he’ll run anything, McCain administration will be a disaster.   By the way, I find it bitterly ironic that the same leftists that mocked those who called the Soviet Union an “evil empire,” and mocked the hyperbole of those who called the most vile regimes on earth the “axis of evil,” now are blogging that Sarah Palin is evil; bloggers who say that Creationism is more of a threat than Islamic fascism. To say Palin is evil while the gulags weren’t, to say Palin is evil but not Shalit’s private hell, is simply perverse.   But I’m writing this as someone who is politically conservative, someone who believes there is real evil in the world, someone who cares to my essence about the safety of Israel and urban Jews: I don’t trust McCain. Not anymore.   McCain, in his silence, has spoken volumes.   He made his choice and that is just one reason among several why I will make my own choice in November.

Comment Guidelines

The Jewish Week feels comments create a valuable conversation and wants to feature your thoughts on our website. To make everyone feel welcome, we won't publish comments that are profane, irrelevant, promotional or make personal attacks.

Add comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
By submitting this form, you accept the Mollom privacy policy.