Passover ... And Easter
04/04/2010 - 12:55
Anonymous

The seder was a big success.

Our relatives liked our Haggadah, with many reporting it was more meaningful and easier to understand than the tattered version we’d been using for years. And no one complained about the length (which, really, wasn’t all that long).

Ellie reveled in all the compliments she garnered for her illustrations and her reading of The Four Questions. I’m proud to say that while the other children ran off to play, she stayed for the duration of the Haggadah-reading and then celebrated our seder’s successful execution by enthusiastically devouring two matzah balls.

Maybe next year we can get Sophie in on the project as well, although fussy eater that she is, I suspect she won’t be trying matzah balls.

On a completely different note, the girls are today attending their first Easter egg hunt, an event neighbors organize each year in our co-op’s garden. Last year, I avoided it because I felt squeamish about doing anything remotely Christian. But this year, I decided that it’s OK for the girls to occasionally sample other people’s holidays, especially since we invited many of our non-Jewish neighbors over for Chanukah. (One of the Christian kids introduced a gelt-hiding game that was a huge hit.)

Also, the Easter egg hunt is one of the few occasions in which our whole co-op gets together, and I don’t want the girls to feel left out, nor do I want to seem like we’re snubbing our neighbors. I doubt that searching for candy-filled eggs will undermine their Jewish identities, although I still feel a bit awkward about the whole thing and am glad I’m at the office today and not participating.

At the same time, I must confess that Easter candy is one of my guilty pleasures. Those pastel-hued wrappers get me every time. If the girls won’t share today’s bounty with me, I may have to check out the day-after-Easter sale at our local drugstore.
 

Comments

A wounderful story of family for those of us that all older family are gone and younger ones are away with own life. My son manages a restaurant and is always working although he helps his mother and I with outside work

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