Aliyah Blog, Part 10: Alexandra’s Celebrity Treatment
09/10/2009 - 00:00
Anonymous

Thursday, September 10th, 2009

It has already become known in the Israeli media as “the Singles Flight.”

 

Eighty-one single olim got off the Nefesh B’Nefesh flight from JFK on Tuesday. Within an hour, there was one less as Nechama Dina Simon became engaged to her waiting boyfriend.

 

As one of the remaining 80, Alexandra Polsky started getting phone calls from Israeli reporters on Tuesday, with the help of Nefesh B’Nefesh.

 

“They basically went crazy with the slant of the ‘love flight,’ ” Alexandra told me by phone as she rode a sherut commuter van from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem Thursday. She said he had heard that late summer aliyah flights usually have more singles because families prefer earlier flights in order to be established in Israel by the start of the new school year.

 

Unlike your sensitive and more reserved blogger, who tries not to get too personal, Army Radio wanted to know, in a live interview, what kind of Israeli man she was looking for.

 

“I was embarassed . I didn’t really know what to say, so I said what I can say in Hebrew: tall and tanned with a  nice smile, someone who is kind. Very general things. It was fun, but I was extremely tired, and especially when you are being thrown back into speaking Hebrew again, it was a little bit awkward to be talking about that.”

 

Alexandra has been shuttling between Jerusalem, where she has an apartment with a friend, and Tel Aviv, where she is studying part-time at Binah yeshiva. On Sunday she will get her teudah zehut, or identity card.

 

Her top priority now is to find part-time work, perhaps doing grant writing for an non-governmental organization. She may also consider work more related to her degree in biology from Columbia, such as public health.

 

Alexandra is looking forward to Rosh HaShanah in Jerusalem and perhaps a hiking excursion during Sukkot. In between is a new experience: “I’ve never been in Tel Aviv for Yom Kippur before. I’m excited about that.”

Comment Guidelines

The Jewish Week feels comments create a valuable conversation and wants to feature your thoughts on our website. To make everyone feel welcome, we won't publish comments that are profane, irrelevant, promotional or make personal attacks.

Add comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
By submitting this form, you accept the Mollom privacy policy.