Blogs

Between Davka And Awkward

Last Friday afternoon, a group of eight neon yellow-clad dancers wound their way around half of Bryant Park as part of Tamar Ettun’s “Mauve Bird with Yellow Teeth Red Feathers Green Feet and a Rose Belly: Part YELLOW.”

Tamar Ettun and The Moving Company in Bryant Park. Caroline Lagnado

Our R-Rated Presidential Campaign

I don’t want my young granddaughters watching the television coverage of presidential campaign because so much is simply unsuitable for children. 

What should be a unique learning experience about American democracy in action has become an R-rated assault on the senses.

I've never seen one like this. Not Nixon's dirty tricks, not LBJ's daisy petals, not George H.W. Bush's Willy Horton (if you don't remember, Google them).

Family Values

Newt Gingrich, Bob Livingston and Dennis Hastert.

What do they have in common?

All three were Republican congressmen. 

All three were Speaker of the House or the designated speaker.

All three left Congress to trade on their public service to become very wealthy consultants and lobbyists.

All three preached high moral standards, the sanctity of marriage and family values.

They led the campaign to impeach President Bill Clinton, who offended their high moral values by having oral sex with a White House intern.

Seventeen Versions Of Jerusalem

“Wrestling Jerusalem” is a no-frills, virtuosic 90-minute solo performance during which its author, Aaron Davidman plays 17 different characters. His astonishing skill at metamorphosing into men, women, Israelis, Americans, Palestinians, settlers on the right, rabbis on the left, allows us to learn from each of the well-drawn personae. In the play’s preface he cites the words from “Ethics of the Fathers,” “Who is wise? He who learns from all people.” But sadly and somewhat ironically, none of these posturing, polemicizing characters, with the exception of the narrator, is at all likely to learn from another. 

Aaron Davidman in “Wrestling Jerusalem.” Courtesy 59E59 Theaters

Autism Awareness Month: Sensory Overload And Jewish Holidays

Editor's Note: Originally published by Jewish Book Council as part of the Visiting Scribe blog series on The ProsenPeopleWe are delighted to share Liane Carter's perspective about autism and her family's experience.

Purim is one of the many “they tried to kill us, we won, let’s eat” Jewish holidays. But for an autistic child like my son Mickey, Purim is first and foremost a holiday about sensory overload.

It starts with the noise: the raucous Purim spiel; the cacophony of gragers; the booing, howling, hooting, and hissing to drown out Haman’s name during the Megillah reading. Add blazing lights, the pink sugary smell of cotton candy, the bang and clang of carnival games, and the press of a hundred children pushing past him to grab the Dunkin Munchkins. It’s simply too much for an autistic child with a hyper-vigilant sensory system.

Baseball For All With Jerusalem's Friendship Circle

JERUSALEM—What was most noticeable at last week’s baseball game between the “Cubs” and the “White Sox” at Jerusalem’s Kraft Stadium were the smiles and laughter as players stepped up to the plate and then rounded the bases in an inaugural game for children with special needs, sponsored by the Friendship Circle of Central Jerusalem.

Baseball For All. Courtesy of Chabad.org

Adelson To Audition Cruz

Sen. Ted Cruz will audition for casino billionaire Sheldon Adelson and his faithful followers of the Republican Jewish Coalition next week.   

The arch conservative second place Republican presidential candidate will speak to the Adelson Primary, aka the Spring Leadership Meeting of the Republican Jewish Coalition, on April 9 at Adelson's Venetian Resort and Casino in Las Vegas.

Self-Care And Spring Cleaning: Tips For Parents Raising Kids With Disabilities

As spring approaches, we begin to clean our homes and throw out items we no longer use. Whether it is the toy that your child no longer plays with or the sweater that your spouse never wears, spring cleaning is a time of “out with the old and in with the new”.

Self-Care Mantra. Courtesy of Google Images

Join Us: "Toward Inclusion: Perspectives on Disability, Social Responsibility, and Belonging”

The Jewish disabilities inclusion community has long served as a model of collaboration and cooperation between of various backgrounds.  The recent Ruderman Inclusion Summit in Boston assembled hundreds of people from all parts of the Jewish world.  And the Ramah TIkvah Network has served Jewish campers of all backgrounds since 1970.  A “typical” camper may come from a Reform background, attend a Conservative Movement camp, and participate in activities sponsored by Chabad (Orthodox) or Friendship Circle. 

Announcing The Second Ruderman "Best in Business" Award: Recognizing Companies That Hire People With Disabilities

Last spring, the Ruderman Family Foundation partnered with the Jewish Week Media Group to produce its first Ruderman “Best in Business” supplementrecognizing exemplary businesses that have demonstrated a history of employing people with disabilities, training and supporting them and developing innovative approaches to maximizing employee’s abilities. Ten businesses were selected through a national nomination and review process and were profiled in both a print and online supplement.

Ruderman "Best in Business" Supplement 2015
Syndicate content