Steve Lipman's blog

Israeli Charity Serving People With Disabilities Breaks With U.S. Arm

The photograph was a fundraiser’s dream: a frail child in a gold-and-black dress struggling for balance on a walker. The caption accompanying the photo described her plight: “Ayalah [is] a beautiful five-year-old born with spina bifida and is paralyzed from the waist down.”

Rabbi Shlomo Braun, right, with Mayor-elect Bill de Blasio. Via Jewocity.com

Wheelchair Basketball Star Heads For Maccabiah Games, Harvard Law

Emily Seelenfreund  was diagnosed at birth with a disease that made her vulnerable to broken bones, and was enrolled in physical therapy at 6 months. By the time she was 5, the Hoboken native was outfitted with a wheelchair that helped her get around and was an active competitor in track and field events for the disabled. By the time she was 11, she began playing wheelchair basketball.

Emily Seelenfreund held a demonstration at Jewish Federation of Greater MetroWest NJ on July 2. Ron Kaplan

Fighting Back -- And Fighting Good

One part of the reporting I did for the story in this week’s Yom HaShoah issue, about medical resistance during the Holocaust, how physicians and nurses and other members of the putative healing professions took a stand against Nazi genocide, sounded familiar.

I grew up hearing a story along these lines – but in this case, how some doctors in Nazi Germany did not stand up.

Dr. Cheyenne Martin: Teaching about doctors who honored their profession

Giving The Holocaust A Human Face

 

In the immediate decades after World War II, the systematic murder of 6,000,000 Jews as part of Nazi genocide had not acquired a name of its own. When I learned about the fate of the Jews during the Final Solution, during religious school classes and temple youth groups in the 1960s, “Holocaust” hadn’t entered the public lexicon in this context.

But 60 years ago this spring, the Six Million acquired a face in this country.

Her name was Hanna Bloch Kohner.

Hannah Bloch Kohner: Her life was many survivors' lives/vogcharity.org

A Note-worthy Memorial To Soldiers

 

Every day, religiously, Don Brittain, a retired aerospace worker who lives in Tacoma, Washington, checks the paper for that day’s sundown time.

Brittain’s religion is not Judaism; he’s not interested in the latest time to daven the after mincha prayer service, or, on Friday, to determine the right time for candle-lighting.

He’s figuring out when to play Taps.

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Memory Marches On

An interracial group, including men and women from around the country, began gathering at a community college in Selma, Alabama, early on Sunday morning last week.

Civil rights marches -- and their subsequent re-enactments -- follow in old footsteps/Shalom Center

Well-Deserved Honor

At last week’s Academy Awards ceremony, one of the favorites was Anne Hathaway.

Anne Hathaway: big honor, small role. Photo via Biography.com

Super Hospitality

Are you ready for some football?  A year from now in New Jersey?

The site of 2014 Super Bowl

Tolerance? It Doesn't Have A Prayer

A pastor in Connecticut apologized to his flock last week.

Memorial service for Newtown victims: Lutherans not welcome

Storm Coverage Presents Dilemma

This week’s issue of The Jewish Week includes the latest in a series of stories the paper’s staff has written on the aftermath of Sandy since the Superstorm struck New York, and the surrounding Northeast states, three months ago. This week’s focus, in a report I wrote, is southern Brooklyn – the Atlantic coast neighborhoods like Seagate, Coney Island and Brighton Beach, which suffered a disproportionate amount of flood-caused damage.

Satellite image of Sandy: Storm presented a challange for journalists. Via NASA
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