Sandee Brawarsky's blog

Sharon’s Life And Family Roots Celebrated In Belarus

Ariel Sharon’s grandfather moved to Palestine in 1910 from the town of Brest Litovsk in White Russia. But after two years in Rehovot, enduring hardships, he returned to his native town. Then, in 1922, his son (Ariel Sharon’s father), also made aliyah, to escape persecution. A student of agronomy, he and his wife settled on a moshav northeast of Tel Aviv, where their son was born six years later.  Ariel Sharon would often speak of his childhood on the moshav, Kfar Malal, where his love of the rural life took root. 

Gilad Sharon at the opening of the exhibition. Yossi Aloni

Breaking Away, Looking Back

Sara Erenthal likes to think of her one-woman gallery show as a brief memoir. From the moment that visitors walk through the door of the Soapbox Gallery in Brooklyn’s Prospect Heights, they enter her life, first via her childhood bedroom.

The artist Sara Erenthal next to "Eidele Meidele."

Chief Rabbi’s Historic Letter In New Hands

As reported last week, a 1954 handwritten letter from Chief Rabbi Isaac Halevi Herzog to the author of the book “Judaism in Islam” was offered at auction by Kestenbaum & Company. A private collector in Los Angeles, Alan Stern, bought the letter for $9000.

Courtesy of Kestenbaum & Company

Catskills On Broadway

“It was air conditioning that leveled the Catskills,” one of the cross-dressing characters in Harvey Fierstein’s excellent new play, “Casa Valentina,” says. “Why drive when you can use a machine to cool off your home?”

Nick Westrate, Patrick Page and Tom McGowan in "Casa Valentina." Courtesy of Manhattan Theatre Club

The Yiddish ‘Godot’ To Open Irish Festival

Attendees at the opening performance at this summer’s annual Beckett Festival in Enniskillen, Northern Ireland will hear the Irish-born Nobel-prize winning author’s most famous play not in French, the language in which he wrote it, nor English, his native tongue into which he translated it, but in Yiddish.

David Mandelbaum, Avi Hoffman and Shane Baker in New Yiddish Rep’s “Waiting for Godot.”   Ronald L. Glassman

Philomena’s Jewish Moment

"Philomena" may be the come-from-behind winner in Sunday night’s Academy Awards presentations. The outstanding film –based on a true story -- about an Irish Catholic woman searching for the son she was forced to give up as a teenager when she was sent to a convent has been nominated for four Oscars, including Best Film.

Judy Dench  and Steve Coogan in “Philomena.” Photo courtesy of The Weinstein Company

David Broza’s Jerusalems

“[What’s So Funny ‘Bout] Peace Love & Understanding” David Broza asks, in his recording of Nick Lowe’s song on his new CD, “East Jerusalem/West Jerusalem.” That song, with the accompaniment of the Jerusalem Youth Chorus of the Jerusalem International YMCA – a group of Jewish and Arab teens -- is now being played regularly on Galei Zahal, Israel Army Radio.

David Broza. Photo by Michael Datikash

Remembering Sid Caesar

Comedy great Sid Caesar died on Wednesday at age 91, at his home in Beverly Hills.  His pioneering work in television in the 1950s, with “Your Show of Shows,” spawned television’s golden age. I interviewed Caesar in November 2003 when his book  “My Life in Comedy, With Love and Laughter" was published.  Some excerpts of that interview follow.

Sid Caesar, 1922 - 2014

National Jewish Book Awards Announced

Yossi Klein Halevi’s “Like Dreamers” was named the 2013 Jewish Book of the Year by the Jewish Book Council. The National Jewish Book Awards were announced in 17 categories, with Klein and other Israelis winning key prizes.

A Virtual Tour Of Tel Aviv Architecture

A graphic artist’s search for a new apartment in Tel Aviv has resulted in a spectacular new website documenting some of the White City’s most distinctive buildings.

Avner Gicelter, 44 Balfour Street.
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