Emily C.A. Snyder's blog

A Joyful Noise

I sing to make a joyful noise.

In the face of an uncertain New Year, with tensions high across ethnic and religious divides, National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene (NYTF) has entered into an exciting new partnership with Museum of Jewish Heritage and to encourage the long-standing ties of brotherhood between all men of good will.

Tony Perry, left, Magda Fishman, Elmore James during the Soul to Soul concert. Courtesy of National Yiddish Theatre Folksbiene

Backstage At Club Gelbe Stern

Amidst the clink of cutlery and the gentle murmur of strangers cheerfully bumping elbows in the Laurie Beechman Theatre on 42nd Street, a striking woman rushes in, checks her face in the mirror—a little bruised, but still strong—and then brazenly takes the stage.

Alexis Fishman in "Club Gelbe Stern: Berlin’s Last Starlit Night." Photo courtesy Hunter Canning

The Memorabilia Of Mourning

The chair where she isn’t sitting. The second cup of tea untouched. The postcard she wrote, back when you could still smell her, that simply reads: “Come find me.”  The Memorabilia of Mourning.

Robert Kitchens (Orpheus) and Amanda Dieli (Eurydice) in “The Orpheus Variations.”  Mitch Dean

Mendelssohn’s Unifying Voices

Carnegie Hall on a Sunday afternoon.  A young child sits next to an old man, while a young couple slides in next to a pair of stately aficionados. There are a few out of town visitors, but this afternoon’s presentation by the New York City Choral Society of Mendelssohn’s rarely performed “Saint Paul” is for us: the citizens of this great, and diverse city.

David Hayes conducts the New York Choral Society.  Courtesy Dan Dutcher Public Relations

Defiant Joy: The Music Of Shlomo Carlebach On Broadway

In “Soul Doctor,” the new musical inspired by the life of Rabbi Shlomo Carlebach, there’s a moment of transcendence in the first ten minutes.

Hayden Wall and Anthony Laciura in "Soul Doctor"

Bridging Middle East Borders At The Fringe

With the 2014 New York International Fringe Festival upon us, one play stands out among the rest.  Meron Langsner’s “Over Here,” presented by Mortal Folly Theatre, depicts an unlikely friendship between a Palestinian-American and an Israeli immigrant in the rubble of the Twin Towers.

Meron Langsner. Allison McDonough

“Jewish Is Hard”

There are two things you should never discuss: politics and religion.

However, those are really the only two things worth talking about.

Katharine McLeod and Jamie Geiger in “The Religion Thing.” Jimmy Ryan

This Jew Hath Eyes

"The Merchant of Venice," like many of Shakespeare’s middle “comedies,” is often considered a problem play: the language is dense, the final courtroom scene fraught with near-tragedy, and for even the most casual observer, the language is steeped with anti-Semitic vitriol.

Joseph Menino as Shylock and Imani Jade Powers as Jessica in “The Merchant of Venice.”  Allison Stock

Devarim At Downton

Like many New Yorkers looking to escape the cold, I settled down the other night with my hottest cuppa tea and delved into the world of Downton Abbey.

A world full of good old English values, a world where the introduction of a modern electric mixing bowl is greeted with alarm—and a world that would likely go into an apoplectic shock at the very thought of peyot and phylacteries.

Robert, Duchess of Yeovil, Mary; "Downton Abbey, Season 4: Part Two." Photo courtesy PBS

Have Yourself A Happy (Second) Chanukah

For many, the winter holiday season can sometime feel like elbowing for room at the family table: Chanukah, Christmas, Kawaanza, Solstice, (Festivus!)…the list goes on.

But this year, latkes came with a slice of pumpkin pie.  And while it was nice to spin the dreidel in-between bastings, for many the Festival of Lights should come with a side of snow.

Photo courtesy Metropolitan Klezmer
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