Caroline Lagnado's blog

Painting On The Walls

It’s not often that an artist would invite members of the public to participate in his exhibit or that a respected museum would allow visitors to draw and paint on its walls.

Installation at the New Museum by Pawel Althamer. Courtesy of Susan Hoffman Fishman

Celebrating 1960s Global Minimalism In Style

To celebrate its new exhibit on global minimalist sculpture, “Other Primary Structures,”  The Jewish Museum opened its galleries and hosted a dance party for revelers last week.

Installation view of "Other Primary Structures" at The Jewish Museum, New York. David Heald/The Jewish Museum

Returning Anew To Minimalist Sculpture

“Other Primary Structures” at The Jewish Museum can be seen as a nod to the institution’s past. The museum staged a major exhibit of minimalist sculpture called “Primary Structures: Younger American and British Sculptors” in 1966.

Installation view of "Other Primary Structures" at The Jewish Museum, New York. Courtesy of David Heald/The Jewish Museum

A Sense Of Place

The large-scale photographs in Sharon Ya’ari’s first solo exhibit at the Andrea Meislin Gallery beg for explanation. Why, for instance, is there a smoky haze in the two images called “Rashi Street, Tel Aviv?”

Sharon Ya'ari, "Rashi Street, Tel Aviv," 2008. Courtesy of Andrea Meislin Gallery and Sommer Contemporary Art Gallery

Surprises At The Sotheby’s Auctions

The results are in from last Tuesday’s auctions at Sotheby’s when the Upper East Side auction house held its annual December sales on Important Judaica and Israeli & International Art.

Untitled, Adi Nes, 1999. Photo courtesy Sotheby’s

High Profile Art And Judaica At Sotheby’s

Each December (perhaps in time for holiday shopping?), Sotheby’s in New York presents its sales of ”Important Judaica” as well as “Israeli and International Art.”

Miniscule Torah Scroll (Germany, 19th century). Courtesy of Sotheby's

Hofesh Shechter's Deceptive Light At BAM

In “Political Mother,” Hofesh Shechter’s 2012 debut at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, the Howard Gilman Opera House was bathed in darkness. The music was loud, explosive hard rock.

“Sun,” Hofesh Shechter Company. Ian Douglas

Two Artists Address Difficult Issues In Tribeca Exhibit

Tribeca’s Synagogue for the Arts, which is an architectural masterwork itself, is hosting a new exhibit in its downstairs gallery space, featuring work by Yona Verwer, a Dutch-born, New York-based artist and Heather Stoltz, also a New York artist. Each looks to the topic of vulnerability in New York City.

 

Times Square Taxi -- God's Medallion. Yona Verwer.

Etgar Keret, In Film And In Person, At Symphony Space

At one point in “Crazy Glue,” a short film by Elizabeth Orne, a young wife who has been involved in an extramarital affair returns home to find that her husband has crazy glued every movable object in their small apartment. The chairs won’t budge, the receiver will not lift off the phone, the fridge won’t open. When she looks up, she finds that her husband has even glued himself to the ceiling, hanging down, waiting for her to return to him.

Etgar Keret is one of Israel's most celebrated writers. Anna Kaim

Mediterranean On The Hudson

Set against the imagined backdrop of Israel’s portion of the Mediterranean Sea, Amos Pinhasi opened this year’s Between the Seas Festival last Monday evening with “Mediterraneo.” The piece, combining dance and performance art, was meant to delve into the dancer’s own memories of his childhood in Israel.

Amos Pinhasi in "Mediterraneo." Flavia Zaganelli
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