black-Jewish relations

Donald Sterling Approves Sale Of LA Clippers, Drops Lawsuit Against NBA

06/05/2014
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Donald Sterling, banned owner of the Los Angeles Clippers, has approved the sale of the team and will drop his lawsuit against the NBA over his lifetime ban from the league and a $2.5 million fine.

NBA Takes Steps To Terminate Sterling’s Ownership Rights

05/21/2014
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The National Basketball Association filed paperwork to terminate Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling of all ownership rights in the franchise.

Looking Back, From Addis Ababa To Crown Heights

08/09/2011
Editor And Publisher

Two very different landmark events in black-Jewish relations took place in 1991, one tragic and one thrilling. Twenty years later, the repercussions are still being felt.

On Aug. 19, 1991, a car accident in the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn launched a perfect storm of violence, transforming a longstanding resentment among some blacks of Jews in general and neighborhood chasidim in particular into three days of rage and riots that some historians have called the worst case of anti-Semitism in American history.

Gary Rosenblatt

Love In Black And White (And Jewish)

‘Sam’s Romance’ explores the 1950s relationship between a middle-aged Jewish man and his young African-American employee.

06/14/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

Loneliness, as an old Jewish proverb says, breaks the spirit. In Paul Manuel Kane’s new play, “Sam’s Romance,” set in Greenwich Village in the early 1950s, an awkward middle-aged Jewish housewares/hardware store owner, Sam (Ed Kershen) falls for his 20-year-old African-American female clerk, Natalie (Oni Brown). But Sam’s cousin Rose (LeeAnne Hutchison) — who is trapped in an unhappy marriage with a wounded vet, Joe (Todd Licea) has another agenda for her cousin — involving her brassy friend Luba (Neva Small).

Ed Kershen and Oni Brown in “Sam’s Romance.”

The Rabbi Was A ‘Freedom Rider’

N.J. spiritual leader, part of a new PBS documentary, looks back on his role in the civil rights struggle.

05/11/2011
Staff Writer

When Rabbi Israel S. Dresner got a call 50 years ago asking if he’d be willing to go on a Freedom Ride aimed at desegregating bus stations in the South, he did not hesitate.

“Remember, I’m a guy who grew up in the 1930s when Hitler was on the rise,” Rabbi Dresner, now 82, said in a recent interview from his home in Wayne, N.J. “How can I not be against racism?”

Rabbi Israel S. Dresner

Martin Luther King and Jewish isolation

On Martin Luther King's birthday, we're going to hear a lot of starry eyed reminisces about the glory days of black-Jewish amity during the civil rights movement, and muttered complaints about anti-Semitism among African Americans. And we're going to hear the usual stories about how King wasn't a perfect human being and how he sometimes opposed the things most of the Jewish community supports.

Gov. David Paterson Interview Part 2

 New York Gov. David Paterson discusses tuition loans for rabbinical students, Eliot Spitzer, his own political future, black-Jewish relations and Saturday Night Live in part of the the Jewish Week's MetroPolitics vlog interview.

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