Benjamin Netanyahu

Netanyahu to Congress: No Compromise on Jerusalem, Refugees or Jordan River Presence

05/24/2011
JTA

WASHINGTON (JTA) – Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said that any peace deal with the Palestinians must grant Israel a military presence along the Jordan River, exclude repatriation of Palestinian refugees to Israel and leave Jerusalem as Israel’s united capital.

However, the Israeli leader said in his address to a joint meeting of Congress on Tuesday, some Jewish settlements in the West Bank would fall outside Israel’s borders in a final peace deal.

Netanyahu's real message to Congress: I'm like you, Israel is like America

Minute after Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu left the House dais to rapturous applause, I had a call from a friend who also watched the long-anticipated speech to a joint meeting of Congress.

“He looks so smug, almost lounging against the podium,” my friend complained. “It creates a bad impression.”

Bibi’s Blunder: The Mideast’s Mr. No

Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu had an excellent response to President Obama’s major speech on the Arab world and the Israel-Palestinian conflict. But it came two days too late, and the net result is another hasbara disaster for Jerusalem.

Netanyahu said on Saturday that Obama had “shown his commitment to Israel’s security, both in word and deed,” in Thursday’s Presidential speech, adding: “We are working with the administration to achieve common goals.”

Obama at AIPAC: Let the Fun Begin

05/20/2011
Special to the Jewish Week

President Obama’s advisors wanted him to get out in front of Prime Minister Netanyahu’s address to a joint session of Congress on Monday. So they preempted Bibi’s own peace proposal by having Obama call for Israel to return to its 1967 borders, give or take a few land swaps.

Digesting Obama’s Speech—Some Goes Down Easy, Some Hard

05/20/2011
JTA

WASHINGTON (JTA) -- Within hours of President Obama's Middle East policy speech, Israeli leaders and Jewish groups on the left and right were picking through his remarks on Israel, alternately praising, fretting and criticizing.

The big news was that Obama called for negotiations based on the pre-1967 lines, with land swaps.

“We believe the borders of Israel and Palestine should be based on the 1967 lines with mutually agreed swaps, so that secure and recognized borders are established for both states," he said.

Jewish Groups Plan Ads for Bibi Visit

05/19/2011

WASHINGTON (JTA) -- A number of Jewish groups are planning wide-reaching ads in time for Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's visit to Washington.

J Street is paying for a New York Times ad featuring an appeal by about 90 leading Israelis, including retired generals, noted scholars and prize laureates, calling on Israel to recognize Palestinian statehood and negotiate a deal with the Palestinians based on 1967 lines.

Bibi’s Speech: Risks And Opportunities

05/17/2011
Editorial

With Israel confronting growing international isolation and a reckless Palestinian campaign to end-run direct negotiations at the United Nations in September, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu faces difficult challenges during his U.S. visit this week.

In particular, the prime minister’s speech to a joint meeting of Congress on Tuesday is both an opportunity and a risk.

In D.C., Dueling Israel Ads

05/17/2011
Staff Writer

A battle of the ads is shaping up this week in Washington, D.C. to coincide with the visit of Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

A coalition of human rights groups, including the Washington Interfaith Alliance for Middle East Peace, has placed 100 “End US Aid to Israel” advertisements in Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority subway cars.

The Israel Project, a nonprofit pro-Israel group, is launching its own ad campaign both in print in Washington and nationwide on four cable TV stations.

Looking To Bibi, As The World Closes In

05/17/2011
Editor And Publisher

 Can you feel the world closing in on Israel?

Other issues on the Jewish agenda pale before a series of looming showdowns for Jerusalem, from major addresses by President Obama and Prime Minister Netanyahu on the Mideast, to another flotilla setting sail soon for Gaza, to the Palestinian drive for statehood at the United Nations this fall.

Gary Rosenblatt

On Eve of Netanyahu Visit and AIPAC Conference, Obama and Bibi Appear on Same Page

05/17/2011
JTA

WASHINGTON (JTA) -- Crush terrorists and then make peace.

Through quirks of timing, it's a narrative that President Obama and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu finally can agree on when they meet this week in Washington.

There remains a critical difference, however, between the two over what happens in the next chapter: Keep up the fight or step out and make peace.

The Obama administration, at least by default, seems to have embraced Netanyahu’s longtime mantra that the best way to clear the path to calm is through the elimination of terrorists.

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