Bedouin

Dead Sea Scrolls: From Qumran Caves to Museums to the Web

After the Dead Sea Scrolls were discovered in a cave in Qumran in the winter of 1946–47 by Muhammed edh-Dhib, a Bedouin boy, and his cousin, it still took two decades until they were placed on display in a museum.

The Dead Sea Scrolls are now online thanks to Google

Israel To Relocate 30,000 Bedouin

Controversial move decried by rights activists.

09/12/2011

Israel's Cabinet approved a plan to relocate up to 30,000 Bedouin from unrecognized villages in the Negev to state-recognized settlements.

The Cabinet also approved $335 million a plan for the economic development of the Bedouin sector in the Negev Desert. The plan includes giving status to the Bedouin communities in the Negev, providing economic development and resolving claims over land ownership. It establishes a mechanism for implementation and enforcement, as well as timetables, as part of the government's work in developing the Negev.

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