Barack Obama

Obama, Netanyahu Talk ‘De-escalation’

11/18/2012

President Obama and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu discussed "de-escalation" of the Gaza conflict.

"Prime Minister Netanyahu called the President today to provide an update on the situation in Israel and Gaza," said a White House statement released late Frdiay.  "The Prime Minister expressed his deep appreciation to the president and the American people for the United States’ investment in the Iron Dome rocket and mortar defense system, which has effectively defeated hundreds of incoming rockets from Gaza and saved countless Israeli lives."

Obama Reaffirms Statehood Opposition

11/12/2012

President Obama told Palestinian Authority President Abbas that the United States remains opposed to unilateral bids to achieve statehood status at the United Nations.

"In his discussion with President Abbas, President Obama reaffirmed his commitment to Middle East peace and his strong support for direct negotiations between Israel and the Palestinians with the objective of two states living side by side in peace and security," a White House statement said Sunday evening. "He also reiterated the United States' opposition to unilateral efforts at the United Nations."

Re-Uniting The United States: A Last Look At The Election

11/09/2012

No matter whether one’s candidate of choice won or lost this past Tuesday, there was an almost tangible sense of relief in the air– the long and stressful presidential campaign was finally over. 

Rabbi Gerald C. Skolnik is the spiritual leader of the Forest Hills Jewish Center in Queens.

Netanyahu Among 13 Leaders Obama Calls Post-Election

11/09/2012

-- Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was one of 13 world leaders that President Obama called to thank for congratulatory messages following his reelection.

"In each call, he thanked his counterpart for their friendship and partnership thus far and expressed his desire to continue close cooperation moving ahead," the White House said Thursday in a statement.

In his own statement, Netanyahu said he told Obama that his reelection was "a vote of confidence in your leadership."

In Victory, Obama Gets 69% Of Jewish Vote, Exit Polls Say

Totals down from ’08; Israel issue not seen moving big numbers of Jewish voters to GOP column.

11/07/2012
Staff Writer

In winning re-election Tuesday, President Barack Obama beat back a strong challenge from former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, who tried to woo Jewish voters by painting Obama as an untrustworthy ally of Israel.

Obama received 69 percent of the Jewish vote. Getty Images

Poll: Romney Wins, Among American-Israeli Citizens

Losing GOP presidential candidate receives 85 percent of dual citizens' votes.

11/07/2012
Staff Writer

An exit poll of 1,572 Jews who hold dual American-Israeli citizenship cast their absentee ballots overwhelmingly for Romney — 85 percent to just 14 percent for Obama. The poll, which has a margin of error of 2.5 percent, was conducted Oct. 22-24 and found that the No. 1 issue for voters was Israel and its related issues, such as the status of Jerusalem and Palestinians. Some 61 percent of voters listed it as No. 1.

An overwhelming majority of dual Israeli-American citizens voted for Romney. Photo courtesy Nefesh B'Nefesh

Israelis Brace For A Second Term

Despite their distrust of Obama, Isrealis acknowledge the president’s support for its security.

11/07/2012
Israel Correspondent

Jerusalem — The moment President Barack Obama declared victory, Israelis — both pundits and private individuals — began pondering what it could mean for Israel-U.S. relations.

“We want the best for the U.S. because we love the American people, but I hope we won’t need their government because, while I respect Obama, I don’t trust him,” said Michal Yehoshua, a 21-year-old government employee, sipping hot coffee during a break.

Will Israel lose leverage with Obama now that the Jewish vote is no longer an issue? Getty Images

Voices From The Polls: In City And Suburb, Jewish Voters Speak Out

From Manhattan to West Hempstead, Jews pull the lever and ponder the issues

11/07/2012

Across a storm-battered city and suburbs on Monday, Jewish voters went to the polls in substantial numbers, and shared their opinions about their choices.

“As a Jew, there’s no way I vote for the man in the White House right now,” said Leonard Daniels, 48, who is currently looking for work and has an accounting degree, as he voted on the Upper West Side at the Church of St. Peter and St. Paul on 86th Street.

Obama took the state of New York, but some Jewish voters opposed him vehemently. Getty Images

Obama Defeats Romney To Take Second Term, 69 Percent Of Jewish Vote

11/06/2012
Assistant Managing Editor

President Barack Obama was easily re-elected to a second term Tuesday, with a victory in the hard-fought battleground of Ohio pushing him over the margin around 11 p.m. Obama had 303 electoral votes, needing 270 to win, while Republican Mitt Romney won 203 electoral votes as of early Wednesday.

Obama garnered 69 percent of the Jewish vote, according to exit polls. Such polls in 2008 showed Obama getting 78 percent of the Jewish vote. That figure was subsequently adjusted to 74 percent after an analysis of national and exit polls.

President Obama tweeted this photo, with wife Michelle, to supporters after his victory Tuesday.

Don't Peg Me Politically

You're Jewish right? Oh! You must be voting Baritt Robamny.

Hmm, interesting theory. But unless we're voting against an evil candidate, say something out of 1930's European Facism, I don't want to be politically pegged just because I'm Jewish. I may share the same religion as you but I intend to make up my own mind, thank you.

However, I do continue to wonder, is there a 'Jewish' position on American politics?

Sorry, God said nothing about GDP growth at Sinai. Getty Images
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