Your weekly guide to what's hot in New York area arts.
09/24/2014
Calendars Editor
Photo Galleria: 
Menasha Oppenheim and Lili Liliana in scene from Joseph Seiden’s “Kol Nidre.”
Menasha Oppenheim and Lili Liliana in scene from Joseph Seiden’s “Kol Nidre.”

THE BUZZ

BARBARA NESSIM: AN ARTFUL LIFE

Bard Graduate Center opens its retrospective of the work of Barbara Nessim. The artist, who hails from a Sephardic New York family, has not only made a career in drawing and textile art, but also was innovative in her early recognition of the potential of computer graphics and experimentation with the medium.

—Opens Fri., Sept. 19. Bard Graduate Center, 38 W. 86th St., (212) 501-3000, bgc.bard.edu/gallery. Through Jan. 11, 2015.

DEBÓRAH DWORK

In conjunction with its exhibit about Jewish life in Auschwitz before the Holocaust, the Museum of Jewish Heritage welcomes the Holocaust scholar and author Debórah Dwork. She’ll speak about the infamous death camp in commemoration of the 70th anniversary of its prisoner revolt. Following the lecture will be a tour of the exhibition.

—Sun., Oct. 5, 2:30 p.m., $5/members free. The Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust, Edmond J. Safra Plaza, 36 Battery Place, (646) 437-4204, mjhnyc.org.

KOL NIDRE

Shortly before synagogues hold Yom Kippur services, you can experience a different “Kol Nidre” — a restored 1939 Yiddish film that smacks of a proto-Bollywood with its theatrical musical numbers integrated into the storytelling. In traditional Yiddish melodrama fashion, passions run high, as a Jewish woman must choose between a rabbinical student and a sly no-goodnik (you’ll have to see the film to find out which suitor wins).

—Wed., Oct. 1, 7 p.m., $10/$7 students and seniors/$5 members. Museum of Jewish Heritage – A Living Memorial to the Holocaust, Edmond J. Safra Plaza, 36 Battery Place, (646) 437-4202, mjhnyc.org.

FILM

THE GREEN PRINCE

This documentary follows the story of Mosab Hassan Yousef, the son of a Hamas leader who turned against the terrorist group and became a spy for Israel, and his unlikely friendship with his Shin-Bet handler.

—Lincoln Plaza Cinema, 1886 Broadway, (212) 757-0359.

NEW YORK FILM FESTIVAL

As is the custom, this year’s NYFF lineup includes Jewish filmmakers, from David Cronenberg to Oren Moverman to Rob Reiner, as well as Jewish content, such as a documentary about fashion icon Iris Apfel. And this year’s retrospective honors Joseph Mankiewicz.

—Check filmlinc.com/nyff2014 for full schedule. Through Oct. 12. (See this week's issue for first of two articles on the NYFF.)

THIS IS WHERE I LEAVE YOU

Jonathan Tropper’s 2010 novel gets the big-screen treatment in “This is Where I Leave You,” a dark comedy of family dysfunction as can only happen during the forced prolonged interaction of shiva. (Tropper wrote the screenplay.) The all-star cast includes Tina Fey, Jane Fonda and Adam Driver.

—Check local listings.

JERUSALEM

The new documentary “Jerusalem” seeks to reveal life in Israel by focusing on three local teenage girls from different religions, each giving a tour of her home city from a unique perspective. The film plays in IMAX in limited release.

—Cradle of Aviation Museum-National Geographic Theater, Charles Lindbergh Blvd., Garden City, (516) 572-4111, jerusalemthemovie.com.

THEATRE

GREED: A MUSICAL FOR OUR TIMES

This new musical comedy features several prominent corrupt bigwigs who fell from grace — including one Bernard Lawrence Madoff.

—Wednesdays 7 p.m., and Thursdays and Saturdays at 8 p.m., $40-$65, New World Stages, Stage 2, 340 W. 50th St., (212) 239-6200, www.telecharge.com. Open run.

BEAUTIFUL: THE CAROLE KING MUSICAL

“Beautiful: The Carole King Musical” traces the iconic singer/songwriter’s life and career, from her hits like “Will You Love Me Tomorrow?” to her relationship with Gerry Goffin, her songwriting partner and husband. Starring the Tony-winning Jessie Mueller.

—The Stephen Sondheim, 124 W. 43rd St., (212) 719-1300, beautifulonbroadway.com. Open run.

BEYOND ME: A SONG CYCLE IN THEY KEY OF SURVIVAL

Suzanne Tanner’s multimedia musical about a St. Louis woman’s experience losing her parents, sister and brothers to the Holocaust and her son to AIDS, will run at the United Solo Festival.

—Sat., Sept. 20, 9 p.m., $19.25. Theatre Row, 410 W. 42nd St., (212) 239-6200, telecharge.com.

MUSIC

BERLIN, MON AMOUR

The material in Adrienne Haan’s cabaret-style concert ranges from Kurt Weill to Edith Piaf, as she performs in English, French, German and Yiddish.

—Sun., Oct. 5, 7 p.m., $25. Zinc Bar, 82 W. 3rd St., (212) 477-9462, brownpapertickets.com/event/865887.

MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES

MUSEUM OF JEWISH HERITAGE

Against the Odds: American Jews & the Rescue of Europe’s Refugees, 1933-1941 presents both individual stories and a portrait of the collective experience of American Jews trying to help relatives, friends or even just strangers thousands of miles away, linked by the shared bond of religion. In particular, the exhibit explores how American immigration laws limited the power of those trying to assist, and how Jews overcame tremendous obstacles to help those in need.

—Museum of Jewish Heritage, 36 Battery Pl. (646) 437-4202. $7-$12.

A Town Known as Auschwitz: The Life and Death of a Jewish Community”: This exhibit explores the vibrancy, peacefulness and Jewish history of the town of Oswiecim, otherwise known as Auschwitz, emphasizing images of the day-to-day life and people that comprised this town before the Holocaust.

—Museum of Jewish Heritage, Edmond J. Safra Plaza, 36 Battery Place, (646) 437-4202, mjhnyc.org.

THE JEWISH MUSEUM

From the Margins: Lee Krasner | Norman Lewis, 1945-1952: As a Jewish woman and African-American man, respectively, Lee Krasner and Norman Lewis were painters who let their “otherness” show in their art. They are the joint subjects of a new Abstract Expressionist exhibit at the Jewish Museum.

—Opening Sept. 12. Through Feb. 1, 2015.

Dani Gal: As From Afar: “As From Afar” is a short film by Israeli artist Dani Gal, playing twice an hour at the Jewish museum. The piece is a dramatic enactment of the relationship between Simon Wiesenthal and once high-ranking Nazi official Albert Speer.

The Jewish Museum, 1109 Fifth Ave., (212) 423-3200, thejewishmuseum.org. Through Feb. 15, 2015.

KINDSIGHT®

The 92nd Street Y hosts an exhibition of Photographer Robert G. Zuckerman’s “Kindsight®” series, emphasizing universal humanity and goodness in the face of an uncertain world. Zuckerman’s aim is also to raise awareness and research money for Adult Polyglucosan Body Disease, a Jewish genetic condition.

—92nd Street Y, 1395 Lexington Ave., (212) 415-5500, 92y.org/Exhibits. Through Oct. 20.

THE GREENHOUSE OF EIN SHEMER

In time for the biblical Shmitah year is “Incubating Ideas and Cultivating Connections: The Greenhouse of Ein Shemer.” The installation is a fusion of science and art, with plants and photographs allowing viewers to explore a universal bond with nature and Israel’s unique relationship with its land.

—JCC in Manhattan, 334 Amsterdam Ave., (646) 505-4414, jccmanhattan.org. Through Oct. 31.

ADELE BLOCH-BAUER II

Gustav Klimt’s portraits of Jewish socialite Adele Bloch-Bauer was looted by the Nazis, but eventually returned to the family. Now, one of the portraits has made its way to MoMA, where it is currently on view.

—MoMA, 11 W. 53rd St., (212) 708-9400, moma.org.

ECHOES OF THE BORSCHT BELT

Marisa Scheinfeld’s photographs reveal the eerie beauty in the decrepit remains of Catskills resorts.

—YU Museum, 15 W. 16th St., (212) 294-8330, yumuseum.org. Through April 12, 2015.

ONCE EVERYTHING WAS MUCH BETTER EVEN THE FUTURE

Nir Hod, the New York-based Israeli artist, returns with an exhibit of stylized and provocative works.

—Paul Kasmin Gallery, 293 10th Ave., (212) 563-4474, paulkasmingallery.com. Through Oct. 25, 2014.

HELEN FRANKENTHALER, COMPOSING WITH COLOR

Paintings by the second-generation Abstract Expressionist composed with color rather than with line.

—Gagosian Gallery, 980 Madison Ave., (212) 741-1111, Gagosian.com. Through Oct. 18.

TALK

TARAS SHEVCHENKO: UKRAINIAN NATIONALISM, POETRY AND THE JEWS

A panel of scholars discusses the Ukrainian nationalist poet’s influence on early Zionist thinkers, from Sholem Aleichem to Ze’ev Jabotinsky.

—Tues., Sept. 30, 7 p.m., $12/$8 members. YIVO, 15 W. 16th St., (212) 246-6080, yivo.org.

COMEDY

PAUL REISER

The prolific comedian actor, writer and musician performs standup next week to raise money for JazzReach, a charity that advocates the spread of jazz in the cultural consciousness and arts education.

—Thurs., Oct. 2, 8 p.m., tickets from $55. Merkin Concert Hall, Goodman House, 129 W. 67th St., (212) 501-3330, kaufmanmusiccenter.org.

 

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