A Virtual Tour Of Tel Aviv Architecture

A graphic artist’s search for a new apartment in Tel Aviv has resulted in a spectacular new website documenting some of the White City’s most distinctive buildings.

Avner Gicelter, 44 Balfour Street.

Start-Up Jerusalem: A New Home For High-End Design

The “YH” in the name of the swanky YH4 Architects’ Gallery is for Yad Harutzim (loosely translated as “Striver’s Row’’), the name of the Jerusalem street where the Gallery established itself this past year.  YH4 is a leader in the budding revival of the city’s dowdy Talpiot industrial district.  The neighborhood’s car dealerships, retail and wholesale enterprises and fast-food restaurants are conspicuous, but some of the city’s premier cultural and business start-ups are hidden from the eye.   One of YH4’s neighbors on the fourth floor of an aging grey-cement building is the Sam Spiegel Film and Television School. 

Designers are leading the revival of a Jerusalem neighborhood. Photo courtesy YH4 Architects’ Gallery

Tracking Tenement Gems

The stone faces that look at us from New York City buildings are called grotesques. On the Lower East Side, they form another layer in the city’s immigrant history.

The Tangled History of Shuls and Real Estate

Had it been two blocks south and a bit farther east, the 16th Street Synagogue would have been included in Gerard R. Wolfe’s excellent new edition of his classic work,  “The Synagogues of New York’s Lower East Side: A Retrospective and Contemporary View,” (Empire State Editions/Fordham University Press). That shul, formerly the Young Israel of Fifth Avenue, is being evicted from its building, after a long dispute with a developer.

Those interested in New York City’s building genealogy and the intertwining connections between real estate interests, immigrant history, shifting populations and synagogue life will find much of interest in Wolfe’s book, first published in 1978. He details the active synagogues (12) and the “lost” or endangered synagogues (24), and also includes a great chronological chart documenting shul mergers and breakaways in New York City, 1654 – 1875.

Sukkah in the City

Aaron Herman attends Sukkah in the City, an international design competition challenging designers, artists and architects to newly reinterpret the structures while following traditional rules.

The Greening of Wuhan

Israeli architects create new design combining housing and greenhouses in densely populated city in central China.
Editorial Intern

Talk about “green” architecture.

An apartment building in which tenants’ apartments encircle greenhouses that occupy the center of the structure was the winning design from two Israeli architects in an international design competition.

Syndicate content