Archaeology

Chipping Away at a Sense of Connection to Israel

Last week, we learned that Jewish extremists vandalized – and in parts destroyed – a 1,600-year-old mosaic in Israel’s Hamat Tiberias Synagogue.

“The damage is widespread … Some of the damage is irreversible,” said Shaul Goldstein, executive director of the Nature and Parks Authority, quoted in the Times of Israel.

Hamat Tiberias Synagogue's mosiac

Israeli Archaeologists Use Facebook to Solve 3,000-Year-Old Mystery

With a planned IPO in 2012 the list of things that people are using Facebook for is only expanding. In Israel, archaeologists are using a Facebook Page to help them solve a 3,000-year-old mystery. The story was originally reported in The Washington Post​ and Mark Weiss explains how Facebook is coming in handy for these archaeologists. He reports from Jerusalem for ​The Irish Times:

Facebook is helping archaeologists in Israel

Dead Sea Scrolls: From Qumran Caves to Museums to the Web

After the Dead Sea Scrolls were discovered in a cave in Qumran in the winter of 1946–47 by Muhammed edh-Dhib, a Bedouin boy, and his cousin, it still took two decades until they were placed on display in a museum.

The Dead Sea Scrolls are now online thanks to Google

Excavation on Ancient Jerusalem Tunnel Completed

01/25/2011

JERUSALEM (JTA) -- The Israel Antiquities Authority completed the excavation of an ancient tunnel that runs from the City of David in eastern Jerusalem to near the Temple Mount.

Officials fear Palestinians may riot, believing that the project is an attempt to damage the Al Aksa Mosque.

The road in the tunnel was used by travelers making pilgrimages to Jerusalem some 2,000 years ago, according to the Israel Antiquities Authority. It was discovered during excavations on a water channel used for drainage during the Second Temple period.

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