Anne Frank

Box Office Hit Sets Kiss Scene in Anne Frank House, Provoking Debate

06/09/2014
Staff Writer
Story Includes Video: 
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“I believe we have a choice in this world about how to tell sad stories,” says Hazel Grace Lancaster, the protagonist of John Green’s recent best-selling novel, "The Fault in Our Stars." The recent film adaptation of the novel, directed by Josh Boone, topped charts this past weekend, grossing $48.2 million during its debut. The film grappled with looming questions about suffering, tragedy and how to truthfully tell sad stories.

A statue of Anne Frank in front of the house in which she hid from the Nazis. Wikimedia Commons

Anne Frank And Her Disciples

With apologies to Nathan Englander, what should we look at when we look at Anne Frank?  Faith & Form, the new exhibit at The Anne Frank Center USA provides some answers.  Aligned with the Center’s mission of using the diary and spirit of Anne Frank as tools to educate about the dangers of racism, anti-Semitism and discrimination, the exhibit features multi-media work by 21 artists, all members of the Jewish Art Salon, addressing those issues in a range of styles and expression. 

Ash Fitzgerald, Passing Through (A Golem's Journey).

Justin Bieber’s Anne Frank Remarks Debated

04/17/2013

Pop music star Justin Bieber’s comments left in a guestbook following a visit to the Anne Frank House drew mixed reactions.

Anne Frank Museum Praises Justin Bieber Visit After Guestbook Flap

04/15/2013

The Anne Frank House defended Justin Bieber's visit to the museum and his guestbook message hoping that the teen diarist "would have been a Belieber."

"The Anne Frank House was pleased to welcome Justin Bieber to the Anne Frank House last Friday. We think it is very positive that he took the time and effort to visit our museum," the Amsterdam-based museum wrote Monday in a post on its Facebook page. "He was very interested in the story of Anne Frank and stayed for over an hour. We hope that his visit will inspire his fans to learn more about her life and hopefully read the diary."

Justin Bieber

Jewish, Beyond Belief: Why Behavior Matters

06/21/2012
Jewish Week Online Columnist
As a native New Yorker, I know that my hometown is famous for many things, ranging from bagels to Broadway. But earlier this summer, our city made national news for a novel, awesome phenomenon:
Deborah Grayson Riegel

J'Accuse! Robert Alter on Nathan Englander, a New Literary Feud

When I saw that the new issue of The New Republic had Robert Alter reviewing a new work by Nathan Englander, I instinctively thought it’d be of Englander’s new translation of the Passover Haggadah.  Given that Alter is a widely admired translator of the Hebrew Bible, it was only natural for me to assume as much. 

9/11 In Amsterdam

Warning: What follows has nothing to do with intermarriage, and it's a few days late for the mountain of 10-year anniversary reflections. Nonetheless, I felt compelled to write and share it anyway:

Had we not been tired and had the admissions lines not been so long that afternoon, my husband and I would have been in the Anne Frank House on 9/11, when the planes hit.

I’ve often wondered what it would have been like to be standing in that famous and ultimately failed hiding place, surrounded by evidence of human evil (and heroism), while hearing the horrifying news.

History And Jewish Identity, Times Two

Two one-woman shows measure the continuing impact of Anne Frank’s story and of apartheid.

09/13/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

History’s shadows never stop lengthening. Two one-woman shows playing next week in New York explore how historical processes shape modern Jewish identity. Carol Lempert’s “After Anne Frank,” investigates the effect of the Dutch teenager’s story on the performer’s own life, while Gabrielle Maisels’ “Bongani” examines a relationship between a white Jewish girl and the black son of her family housekeeper in post-apartheid South Africa.

Gabrielle Maisels as one of 11 characters in her play “Bongani,” about the lingering effects of apartheid.

Anne, With Strings Attached

Puppets are moving, but ‘Compulsion,’Patinkin are less so.

03/01/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

She seems both alive and dead at the same time, a plucky, precocious girl whose life was tragically cut short at 15. How perfectly appropriate then, that Anne Frank is played by an amazingly life-like marionette in Rinne Groff’s “Compulsion,” a play about the Jewish writer Meyer Levin’s obsession with Anne Frank’s diary.

Hannah Cabell, Mandy Patinkin and the life-like marionette portraying Anne Frank in “Compulsion.” Joan Marcus

Meyer Levin’s ‘Obsession’

Two current plays look at the writer’s quest to dramatize Anne Frank’s diary.

02/15/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

He was one of the leading literary lights of the 20th century, but it was another writer’s work that became the object of his obsession. Meyer Levin was a prolific Jewish writer who struggled fruitlessly for three decades to get the world to pay attention to his play about Anne Frank. Now, three decades after his death, Levin finally gets his due with two different plays about his quest on view simultaneously in New York.

Anne Frank, as puppet, and Mandy Patinkin in scene from "Compulsion."
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