Andrea Meislin Gallery

A Sense Of Place

The large-scale photographs in Sharon Ya’ari’s first solo exhibit at the Andrea Meislin Gallery beg for explanation. Why, for instance, is there a smoky haze in the two images called “Rashi Street, Tel Aviv?”

Sharon Ya'ari, "Rashi Street, Tel Aviv," 2008. Courtesy of Andrea Meislin Gallery and Sommer Contemporary Art Gallery

Precariously Balanced

Naomi Leshem’s photographs penetrate life’s in-between moments.

01/21/2014
Culture Editor
Story Includes Video: 
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A young woman named Moria looks up at the sun while sitting on a thin wire cable. She finds her balance by keeping one leg straight, the other bent at almost a right angle. Her shadow is right beneath her. Naomi Leshem’s photograph was taken in Yakum Park in Israel as part of a series called “Centered,” now on view at the Andrea Meislin Gallery in Chelsea.

Woman on wire: This photograph is part of Leshem’s series called “Centered.”

Dreaming In Chelsea

After having lived in Israel for a few years, Andrea Meislin has become an advocate of Israeli photography and the group show now on view in her eponymous gallery is a testimony to that devotion.  Over half the works featured in “Perchance to Dream,” which address themes of sleep and intimacy, are by Israeli artists; and unfairly or not, association with Israel brings with it a specific political and international urgency.

Adi Nes, Untitled, 1999. Digital C-print. Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York.

A Photographer With An Ironic Eye

Vivid purple, yellow and green feathers grow out of his face, peacock feathers crown his head, and green feathers wrap around his neck.  A beard pokes through and a trenchcoat covers his body. An avian humanoid or a man in a Purim costume?

Pavel Wolberg, Bnei Brak, 2012. Courtesy the artist and Andrea Meislin Gallery

A Water-Logged Gallery Brings Its Art To Viewers

Since its exhibition, “Sailboats and Swans,” was interrupted by the fierce winds and water surge caused by Hurricane Sandy, the Andrea Meislin Gallery is getting images from the show out to viewers via email. Every Monday, the gallery emails three photographs of the show, featuring the work of Israeli photographer Michal Chelbin.

Michal Chelbin, Young Prisoners, Juvenile Prison for Boys, Russia, 2009. Photo courtesy Andrea Meislin Gallery
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