American Jewry

Just How Big Is Intermarriage?

You Really Don’t Know

08/26/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
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Even if you’re a very casual observer of the U.S. Jewish community and a friend who knows nothing about it asks you, “How big a phenomenon is Jewish intermarriage?” you’d probably be able to answer, “It’s pretty big.”

Paul Golin

The Year Inclusiveness Prevailed

Forget the Pew naysayers: A new, big-tent kind of Jewish community is being forged.

12/31/2013
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The year gone by was a very good one for the Jewish people — and an even better one for the Jewish Message.

Joshua Hammerman

Not Enough Joy

10/09/2013
Founder/Director Manhattan Jewish Experience
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The newly released Pew findings on Jewish
 continuity paint a bleak future for American Jewry (“Fast-Growing Jewish ‘Nones’ Seen Reshaping Community,” Oct. 4). It reports that 58 percent of respondents who married since 2000 have married a non-Jewish spouse, and only 20 percent of those who have intermarried are raising their
 children Jewish by religion.

Lens On American Jewry

09/10/2013
Special To The Jewish Week
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In his thoughtful and provocative new book, “The American Jewish Story Through Cinema” (University of Texas Press), Eric A. Goldman refers to Hollywood films about American Jewish life as “a Haggadah,” the Passover text that is savored and studied annually.

Eric Goldman investigates nine movies that define the Jewish experience. Rachel Banai

For Israeli Grad Students, American Jewry 101

08/13/2013
Associate Editor
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Will Israeli graduate students really be able to distinguish between the Upper West Side and Great Neck, or tell Philip Roth’s fiction from Allegra Goodman’s?

University of Haifa students will visit the Tenement Museum as part of unique curriculum. Photo via Angelorensanz.com

The ABCs Of American Jewry

Study of American Jews making its way into Israeli schools.

JTA
08/17/2010

 Tel Aviv – The Jews of America may be the largest Jewish community in the diaspora, but that does not mean Israeli schoolchildren learn much about them.

Sixty-two years after Israel’s founding, its school system still largely sticks to the Zionist trope that all Jews should live in Israel and those who do not at the very least should be actively engaged in helping support the Jewish state. In turn, there is scant study of contemporary Jewish life in America.

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