Agunot

Gital Dodelson, Agunah In High-Profile Divorce, Obtains Get

02/05/2014
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Gital Dodelson, the “chained” woman featured on the front page of the New York Post last fall, says she has received a get, or religious writ of divorce, from her husband.

The announcement appeared Wednesday afternoon on a Facebook page dedicated to helping Dodelson obtain a get and was confirmed by a publicist who has worked with the Dodelson family.

I Signed The Post-Nup. Why Haven't You?

I do not want to live in a world in which there is a single woman chained to an empty marriage.

01/31/2014
Special To The Jewish Week
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No one enters a marriage thinking that it will end in divorce. But sometimes, it does. And no one enters a marriage thinking that their spouse might refuse a get-- the religious divorce document-- as leverage for a better divorce settlement or, worse yet, simply to inflict suffering. But sometimes, they do.

We cannot afford not to sign this document, the author writes. Photo courtesy Rori Picker Neiss

Opinion: The Prenup Can Help Everyone

But the document poses a collective action problem: everyone has to sign on.

12/15/2013
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My husband and I agreed when we were dating that if we were ever to get married, we would frame our ketubah, the Jewish marriage contract, and hang it prominently on the wall, with a plaque affixed to the glass that read “In Case of Emergency Break Glass.”

The halachic prenup aims to pre-empt the problem of "chained" women whose husbands won't grant religious divorces. Fotolia

New Agunah Court Announced

Bet din with backing of key haredi jurist now in formation with goal of freeing ‘chained’ wives.

12/11/2013
Editor and Publisher
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In what appears to be a major breakthrough in the long, tortuous effort to solve the problem of agunot, or "chained wives," an international religious court is in formation, headed by a highly respected Orthodox rabbi, with the goal of freeing women trapped in broken marriages.

Gary Rosenblatt

New Effort To End Agunot Crisis

A haredi jurist is backing a rabbinic court that will address the problem of husbands who won't grant divorces.

12/09/2013
Editor And Publisher
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In what appears to be a major breakthrough in the long, tortuous effort to solve the problem of agunot (or, chained wives), an international bet din (religious court) is in formation, headed by a highly respected Orthodox rabbi, with the goal of freeing women trapped in broken marriages.

Blu Greenberg at the JOFA conference where the formation of the new rabbinic court was made public. Photo courtesy JOFA

Time To Act On Agunot

07/03/2013
Editorial

For many years advocates on behalf of agunot (observant Jewish women trapped in unwanted marriages) have sought to resolve the problem through their rabbis. And while many rabbinic authorities have expressed personal empathy and anguish for the plight of these women, the rabbis collectively have insisted that they are powerless in the face of halacha, or Jewish law, which says the husband has the absolute right to determine if and when to end a marriage.

Agunah Cases in the Age of Facebook

Cross-posted to Blog.RabbiJason.com

United States Representative Dave Camp is a proud Roman Catholic. The Republican congressman represents Michigan's 4th District in Congress which includes places in Michigan's "Up North" region that Jews only visit for a few days each year. Aside from the handful of families who live in Traverse City year round, Dave Camp likely doesn't give much thought to Jewish people.

Rep. Dave Camp had to close the comments section of his Facebook page due to protests over his staffer's refusal to grant a get

Agunot: 462 Too Many

10/25/2011
Editorial

The tragedy of agunot — women unable to obtain a Jewish divorce — remains a seemingly unsolvable problem within halacha [Jewish law] that has left too many women in an emotional, legal and financial black hole.

Adding to the problem is the absence of data. In Israel, estimates of 10,000 agunot have been reported by The Wall Street Journal and Jerusalem Post, in contrast to claims by Agudath Israel that there are 180 in the Jewish state, and remarkably, an equal number of men who are being refused divorces by their recalcitrant wives.

Religious Courts Are Treating Agunot Unfairly

10/25/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

There is a disturbing new threat to agunot — women unable to obtain a religious divorce. And only those involved in contentious divorces know about it.

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