Affordable Care Act

Seeking ‘Fixes’ On Court’s Women’s Rights Rulings

07/01/2014
Staff Writer
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Jody Rabhan became director this week of the Washington operations of the National Council of Jewish Women (NCJW), succeeding Sammie Moshenberg, who retired after 33 years with the organization. Rabhan began her career two decades ago as a graduate fellow at the Baltimore Institute for Jewish Communal Service. She continued as a lobbyist for six years before pausing to start a family. She then worked as a private consultant for Jewish nonprofits, specializing in advocacy and development projects. Two years ago she returned as Moshenberg’s deputy. She and her husband have two sons and live in Bethesda, Md.

NCJW’s Jody Rabhan

Beyond The Benefit Of The Doubt

10/31/2013
Jewish Week Correspondent
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My family knows well that the Rob Reiner/Aaron Sorkin film “The American President” is one of my all-time favorites. I can’t even begin to count how many times I’ve watched it, and during particularly difficult times in this country, notably after the events of 9/11, it served as a source of comfort. 

As he would later do so magnificently in “The West Wing,” Sorkin painted a picture of politicians and government who were able to transcend the innumerable temptations to compromise principles for expediency, and actually even reach greatness.

Rabbi Gerald C. Skolnik is the spiritual leader of the Forest Hills Jewish Center in Queens, New York.

Jewish Groups Largely Applaud Health Care Ruling

Supreme Court decision upholding Affordable Care Act seen putting the country ‘significantly forward on a moral path.’

07/03/2012

Washington — American Jewish groups — with the notable exception of the Republican Jewish Coalition — were largely satisfied with the U.S. Supreme Court’s vote to uphold President Obama’s landmark Affordable Care Act in a 5-4 vote.

Nancy Kaufman, CEO of the National Council for Jewish Women, was “thrilled” with the decision. 

Women Should Celebrate Suffrage By Voting

08/24/2011
Special To The Jewish Week Online

Women got the vote 91 years ago this week, but too many of us are still not exercising this most precious right. Single women, in particular, don’t vote in the same numbers as their married sisters, yet are in greater need of government policies and programs that will ensure them a brighter future. Indeed, in 2010, the “marriage gap” -- the difference in voter participation and voter behavior between married women and unmarried women -- was 30 points.

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