Adrienne Cooper

Keeping Adrienne’s Dream Alive

Concert marking singer and Yiddish revival leader’s first yahrtzeit brings together a community of musicians.

12/10/2012
Special To The Jewish Week

Sometimes you just have to drop everything else and do what’s right.

Frank London always has a busy schedule. Between the Klezmatics and his numerous side projects (the most recent being a Latin jazz-Jewish fusion essay with Arturo O’Farrill), there is never a convenient time for London to be interrupted.

Michael Winograd has a new CD being released this month with launch gigs in Boston and Brooklyn. December 2012 is not a rest period for him.

Cooper will be remembered and celebrated with a blow-out concert. Lloyd Wolf

Adrienne Cooper, Mother Of Yiddish Revival Movement

Singer served as bridge between generations.

12/27/2011
Special to the Jewish Week

When Adrienne Cooper died Sunday night, Dec. 25, she left a gap in the world of Yiddish that no one person could possibly fill. Yet she had filled it for decades.

Adrienne Cooper.

New Musical Life For A Supposedly Dead Language

Adrienne Cooper performs new/old Yiddish songs at Drom.

11/04/2010
Special To The Jewish

Jewish history is too unpredictable for folks to count out the Yiddish language just yet. After all, 200 years ago Hebrew was supposedly a dead language used only in Jewish worship. Could there be a real-life version of the mythical “Yiddishland?”

“I don’t think there’s going to be a secular Yiddish community in which people live everyday lives in Yiddish,” Adrienne Cooper reluctantly admits. “But among artists there’s no reason this material can’t be taken up as a means of creative communication.”

New CD consists entirely of material that is either brand new or significantly re-imagined Yiddish songs

Generations Of Yiddish Song

Adrienne Cooper’s new projects span the years,
with collaborators old and new.

07/27/2010
Special To The Jewish Week

Fifty years ago, Yiddish was generally considered a dying language or one that was already dead if still upright. The Shoah and the Gulag had taken a dreadful toll on Yiddish speakers, readers and writers. Isaac Bashevis Singer was much feted as the last of his tribe (although the brilliant poet Abraham Sutzkever would live until 2009), and Yiddish-based musical forms were considered museum pieces.

Adrienne Cooper performs next week at Damrosch Park as part of the “Music for a Better World” show.
Syndicate content