Adolf Eichmann

The Arendt Trial

In her new book on the Eichmann trial, Deborah Lipstadt ‘rescues’ the event from Hannah Arendt.

04/12/2011
Special To The Jewish Week

The trial in 1961 in Israel of Nazi war criminal Adolf Eichmann has been well rehearsed by scholars, in the popular literature, and by journalists and Jewish professionals.

Lipstadt, a professor of history at Emory University, provides a needed historical context for the Eichmann trial.

A Tale Of Two Shoah Trials

After watching Eichmann on TV at 13, she found herself, decades later, in a London courtroom battling Holocaust denial.

04/05/2011

From “The Eichmann Trial,” published by Nextbook/Schocken. Reprinted courtesy of Schocken Books, a division of Random House, Inc. Copyright © 2011 Deborah E. Lipstadt.

On April 11, 1961, the theater of Beit Ha’am, Jerusalem’s brand-new cultural center, was packed. Over 700 people filled the room for the trial of a man accused of being the chief operational officer of the Final Solution.

Justicia with scales. Sefer evronot, 1583. Courtesy of the Library of the Jewish 	Theological Seminary.

Sex And Kristallnacht: The Boy Toy (And Boy Assassin) Who Started It All

For all the talk every Kristallnacht (Nov. 9-10) that we have to remember history and how it happened, there seems to be a collective willing of Jewish amnesia about what exactly happened.

We know that the Nazis unleashed a nationwide pogrom of unparalleled brutality in response to the assassination in Paris of a German official, Ernst Vom Rath, by a Jewish teenager, Herschel Grynszpan, who said he was avenging his parents who were being harassed back in Germany.

Syndicate content