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A Disabilities Act For The Jewish Community

If you have been following The New Normal, or mainstream media, or even happened to do a web search on July 26th when the “Google Doodle” commemorated this day in history, you undoubtedly already know that we've recently marked the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

What could it look like if the Jewish community writ large created a Disabilities Act to address the rights of the 20 percent of American Jews who have a disability? 

True, we often bemoan the fact that the Jewish community lags behind when it comes to “equal rights” for people with and without disabilities. But 25 years is not a long time in the history of our country, and an even shorter amount of time in the history of the Jewish people. With that in mind, I choose optimism: There is time for us to catch up!

Send The New Normal Your Accessibility Complaints And Kudos!

Recently, we heard from  a New Normal reader who has a mobility impairment. She told us that she had a difficult time accessing the 92nd Street Y, the iconic Jewish cultural institution in New York City because there was no pop-up button on the main door, intercom to ask for help and the security guard inside the building was unresponsive.

We reached out to the Y, which replied quickly and responded to her concerns.

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