Abraham Joshua Heschel

Citing Heschel, Hillel International Asks Why We Segregate Youth And Age

01/07/2016 - 12:13
Special To The Jewish Week

In 1960, American “youth” confounded the nation. This burgeoning class of teens so perplexed that other great class of countrymen, “the adults,” that a White House Conference was called, in part, to solve “the problem.” The country’s great rabbi, Abraham Joshua Heschel, was asked to speak and arrived in D.C. with a mutinous response: Do not fixate on the young.

Tamara Mann Tweel

A L’Chaim To Conservative Judaism

JTS chancellor: ‘Complacency’ and ‘despair’ … ‘are forbidden;' ‘both are distractions from the task at hand.’

11/21/2013 - 19:00
Special To The Jewish Week

I’ve spent the better part of my adult life as a scholar of American Judaism, with a special focus on figures at the center of Conservative Judaism, and I’ve spent most of those years enjoying the benefits of Conservative Jewish institutions, conversations and communities.

Chancellor Arnold M. Eisen

The Lesson NOT To Learn From Newtown

12/19/2012 - 19:00
Jewish Week Online Columnist

Of the many critical insights I gained by studying the writings of the late theologian and philosopher Abraham Joshua Heschel, one that had a particularly profound impact on me related to the challenge of talking about God. 

Rabbi Gerald C. Skolnik is the spiritual leader of the Forest Hills Jewish Center in Queens.

Space Exploration: Is It Worth It?

11/13/2012 - 19:00

 

NASA just embarked upon its most ambitious Mars mission to date, spending a whopping $2.5 billion on this 1-ton rover, hoping to find some evidence as to whether or not Mars once supported life.

Rabbi Shmuly Yanklowitz

Making The Ordinary Sacred

10/18/2012 - 20:00
Jewish Week Online Columnist

With the completion of the cycle of holidays that ushered in the new Jewish calendar year, one could almost hear the audible sigh of relief from all quarters of the Jewish community. No more sick days that need to be depleted, no more classes that need to be missed, no more relentless assault of unending, overwhelming holiday meals…we’ve been ready for this for a long time, and it feels awfully good to have reached the holiday-less month of Heshvan.

Rabbi Gerald C. Skolnik is spiritual leader of the Forest Hills Jewish Center.

Is A Synagogue A Relic Of The Past?

03/25/2012 - 20:00
Jewish Week Online Columnist

Many Jews today claim that they are “spiritual not religious,” that organized religion is not relevant, or that they would rather spend their free time alone than with others. Those who attend synagogue weekly often reserve the service, especially the sermon, for a special naptime. Others prefer a 20–person basement setting for a quick prayer service rather than a formal, large gathering at shul. Around two-thirds of Americans claim to be members of a house of worship, which is more than 25 percent higher than Jewish synagogue membership.

Rabbi Yanklowitz is founder and president of Uri L'Tzedek, director of Jewish life and senior Jewish educator at UCLA Hillel.

Conflict Resolution: A Spiritual Approach

10/17/2011 - 20:00
Jewish Week Online Columnist

 

It seems as if there is disagreement and tension everywhere. Most days, I feel surrounded by conflicts that emerge globally, nationally, locally, professionally, and personally.

Rabbi Shmuly Yanklowitz

Why We (Still) Can’t Wait: The Jewish Case for a Living Wage

04/07/2011 - 20:00
Special to the Jewish Week

Forty-three years ago this month, our nation watched the assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King. The images were seared into our minds, along with the sense that our nation had lost a beacon of hope in the ongoing struggle for racial and economic justice. Though he had lived to see many important advances and constitutional guarantees for all Americans regardless of race or creed, Dr. King was murdered before he had made much progress toward another vitally important goal: economic justice.

Of Prophets, Militancy, and Martin Luther King

This week I reported on the role Jews played in the civil rights movement under Martin Luther King.  It's a fascinating story, and one that many people I interviewed told me remains poorly understood.  Often it's reduced to a glib one-liner: Jews supported him, a line captured best by the iconic image of rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel walking with King in from Selma to Montgomery in 1965.

King And Heschel: A Politics Of Prophecy

01/10/2011 - 19:00
Special To The Jewish Week

Abraham Joshua Heschel and Martin Luther King Jr., whose birthdays we recall next week, shared far more than the political partnership on behalf of civil rights immortalized in the iconic 1965 photograph of them marching side by side in Selma, Ala. Their biographies show astonishing parallels. Their theologies of prophecy and providence were closely allied. And the self-images they bore as religious and societal leaders were remarkably similar.

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